Merger Policy and Its Impact on Nepalese Banks

Announcing: Ojha, Sushil and John Walsh, “Merger Policy and Its Impact on Nepalese Banks,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.1, No.2 (2017), available at: http://crcltd.org/images/Merger_Policy_and_Its_Impact_on_Nepalese_Banks.PDF.

Abstract:

The development of Nepalese financial system has three distinct phases which are determined by different milestones. The first phase corresponds with the initiation of formal domestic banking system with limited liabilities (Tejarath Adda, 1880) to the establishment of first bank of Nepal, Nepal Bank Limited, 1937. The second phase commences with the establishment of NRB in 1956 under the NRB Act 1955 which made easier for establishment of banks and financial institutions with the liberal economic policy and the third includes the modernization of Nepalese banks. Central bank of Nepal is known as Nepal Rastra Bank. Nepal Rasta Bank (NRB) has directed the Banking Institutions to follow the mergers and acquisitions policy as per the conditions included in Bank and Financial Institutions Act (BAFIA) section 10 subsection 68 and 69, so that the banking norms will help in maintenance of good corporate governance, free competition among the financial institutions and hedging the corporate risk. The Nepalese Banking Sector is facing a problem of liquidity, additional capital requirement as per NRB regulations and open financial market for the competition. So, in order to cope with this problem Nepal Rasta Bank (NRB) has directed the Banking Institutions to go in the process of mergers and acquisitions. Besides the number of Banking and Financial institutions in Nepal has increased previously but had created the low financial stability. Thus in order to attempt the promotion of financial stability NRB is effectively implementing the Merger and Acquisition of Banks and financial institutions. Merger and Acquisition of financial institutions in Nepal has been promoted in the recent years and is in increasing trend. It is because Merger in the recent years has helped most of the financial institutions to increase the capital as well as help them to become more competitive with maintenance of good corporate governance. However the most important consequences in Nepal after merger is the improvement in financial ratios which also proves a good maintenance of adequate capital in order to protect the consumer right and minimize the risk likely to be under critical scenario. Keywords: Nepal Rastra Bank, Merger and Acquisition Policy, BAFIA

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From Local Gardens to the National Market: The Case of Cut Flowers in Kathmandu

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Announcing: Walsh, John, “From Local Gardens to the National Market: The Case of Cut Flowers in Kathmandu,” International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, Vol.20, Nos.5/6 (2016), pp.320-9. DOI: 10.1504/IJEIM.2016.10000619.(http://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=80010)

Abstract:

Emerging economies develop unevenly, with comparatively small and mostly urban areas being the centre of most development and the place of accommodation for those benefiting from it. In Nepal, a landlocked country graduating from least developed country status, that space is provided almost entirely by central Kathmandu, the capital city. It is there that consumption of consumer goods acquired commercially takes place almost completely. As a middle class emerges, it tends to aspire towards the professionalisation of important family-based rituals, such as weddings and births, as well as religious celebrations. In this situation, cut flowers represent a genuine commercial opportunity as these rituals are professionalised on a seasonal, at least partly predictable pattern. This paper examines how small-scale operations might come to participate in such a commercial sector and what problems and constraints they face in so doing. The result is an exposition of market development in an emerging market.

Keywords: cut flowers; market development; Nepal; price competition; technical capacity; Kathmandu; emerging markets; small-scale operations.

Seasonal Labour Migration from a Rural Nepalese Village

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Announcing: Jha, Dilip Kumar and John Walsh, “Seasonal Labour Migration from a Rural Nepalese Village,” International Journal of Migration and Residential Mobility, Vol.1, No.3 (2016), pp.219-32, abstract available at: http://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=79406.

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and extent of seasonal labour migration among a sample of villagers in Janakpur province of Nepal. Personal interviewing was combined with ethnographic observation with content analysis of the database of findings subsequently conducted. The system of migration is persistent rather than stable; work is available in natural resource extraction or processing facilities and urban environments. The former is easier to plan for than the latter, which can be risky and some migrants are unable to support themselves. The research is limited in both space and time and, owing to the lack of knowledge about the working practices of people in this area, can be considered to be exploratory in nature. It is shown that, under current circumstances, few benefits are yet flowing to the Nepalese village studied.

Keywords: seasonal labour migration; Nepalese villages; India; seasonal work; rural Nepal; ethnography; rural communities.

DOI: 10.1504/IJMRM.2016.10000391

From Local Gardens to the National Market: The Case of Cut Flowers in Kathmandu

scoverijeim

This paper is now listed as a forthcoming paper at the International Journal of Entrepreneurialism and Innovation Management (SCOPUS-listed) (http://www.inderscience.com/info/ingeneral/forthcoming.php?jcode=ijeim):

Abstract: Emerging economies develop unevenly, with comparatively small and mostly urban areas being the centre of most development and the place of accommodation for those benefiting from it. In Nepal, a landlocked country graduating from least developed country status, that space is provided almost entirely by central Kathmandu, the capital city. It is there that consumption of consumer goods acquired commercially takes place almost completely. As a middle class emerges, it tends to aspire towards the professionalization of important family-based rituals, such as weddings and births, as well as religious celebrations. In this situation, cut flowers represent a genuine commercial opportunity as these rituals are professionalized on a seasonal, at least partly predictable pattern. This paper examines how small-scale operations might come to participate in such a commercial sector and what problems and constraints they face in so doing. The result is an exposition of market development in an emerging market.
Keywords: cut flowers; market development; Nepal; price competition; technical capacity

Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.1, No.1 (February, 2016)

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Volume 1, Number 1 of the Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research will be published in February, 2016 by Global College International, Kathmandu and the SIU Research Centre in Thailand, with myself as chief editor. ISSN: 2467-9356.

This is the table of contents of the first issue:

Foreword and Executive Producer by Prof. Dr. Karan Singh Thagunna  p.iii

Editor’s Introducion by John Walsh p.v

Original Articles

High Performance Work Practices Facilitating Employee Engagement: A Study of PSUs in Delhi NCR – Pooja Misra and Jaya Gupta pp.1 – 15
Determinants of the Mobile Handset Purchase Decision of the
Youth in NCR- India – Archana Singh and Ritu Srivastava pp.16 – 21
Factors Affecting Retailer Perceptions for the Sale of Snacking
Products through Traditional Trade Retail Outlets in India – Gagan Katiyar pp.22 – 32
Space and Workplace Issues for Nepalese Female Entrepreneurs,
Street Vendors and Employees – Reema Thakur pp.33 – 43
Identity and Integration in the Asia-Pacific Region through the
Prism of Tourism: Taiwan & Japan – Lin Fan, Lavanchawee
Sujarittanonta and Arunee Lertkornkitja pp.44 – 54
Foreign Direct Investment in Cambodia’s Telecommunications
Industry – Fuangfa Ampornstira pp.55 – 64

Book Reviews
Going Universal: How 24 Developing Countries Are Implementing
Universal Health Coverage Reforms from the Bottom up – Cotlear, Daniel, Somil Nagpal, Owen Smith, Ajay Tandon and Rafael Cortez by John Walsh pp.65 – 66
Capitalism: A Ghost Story – Roy, Arundhati by John Walsh pp.67 – 68

Guidelines for Authors pp.69-70.

Please consider the double-blind peer-reviewed hard copy journal the Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research as a venue for your research paper. Submit to njmsr@gci.edu.np or directly to the editor (jcwalsh@siu.ac.th).

Seasonal Labour Migration from a Rural Nepalese Village

scoverijmrm

Dilip Kumar Jha and John Walsh, “Seasonal Labour Migration from a Rural Nepalese Village,” International Journal of Migration and Residential Mobility,” forthcoming article: http://www.inderscience.com/info/ingeneral/forthcoming.php?jcode=ijmrm.

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and extent of seasonal labour migration among a sample of villagers in Janakpur province of Nepal. Personal interviewing was combined with ethnographic observation with content analysis of the database of findings subsequently conducted. The system of migration is persistent rather than stable; work is available in natural resource extraction or processing facilities and urban environments. The former is easier to plan for than the latter, which can be risky and some migrants are unable to support themselves. The research is limited in both space and time and, owing to the lack of knowledge about the working practices of people in this area, can be considered to be exploratory in nature Better networking and information provision would help migrants find regular jobs and to avoid wasting time and money. The system as it currently exists does little if anything to improve the lives of the migrants and their families overall other than to try to meet sudden unexpected expenses. Otherwise, it seems to provide very little benefit to any stakeholder. Few studies exist that help to indicate how rural Nepal is becoming linked with international markets and what the impacts of such links might be. It is shown that, under current circumstances, few benefits are yet flowing to the Nepalese village studied.
Keywords: migration; Nepal; India; seasonal work; rural

 

ICMC 2015: Cut Flowers in Kathmandu

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I am back now from Greater Noida and this year’s ICMC, which was organized with the usual efficiency and passed off with great success. My paper was on Cut Flowers in Kathmandu and written after interviews during my visit to Nepal earlier this year, just before the earthquake.

As ever, the conference was distinguished by the presentation of the conference book (in two volumes) during the conference itself.

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Walsh, John, “Cut Flowers in Kathmandu: From Local Gardens to International Markets?” in G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, eds., Optimizing Business Growth: Strategies for Scaling up (New Delhi: Bloomsbury Publishing India Pvt. Ltd., 2015), pp.62-9.

Abstract:

Nepal is a landlocked country that shares a long, open border with India to the south, with which it shares numerous cultural, social, religious and economic similarities. The open border means that Indian citizens can freely pursue business opportunities in Nepal and vice versa. However, the poor infrastructure in the country means that export opportunities are limited. This is the case with cut flowers, which are grown for local consumption and primarily for festivals and by hotels and restaurants. If transportation infrastructure were better, it might be more feasible to diversify production for international markets. Additionally, if the local market were to be developed further, it would become feasible to add some value to existing varieties produced for the market. This case investigates the example of a small cut flower business close to Kathmandu as a means of analyzing commercial opportunities in the capital and its environs and the prospects for linking local enterprises more closely with international markets. Constraints to growth are identified in the forms of intensive price competition, limited market development and technical capacity. Options for improving the situation are discussed.

Keywords: cut flowers, market development, Nepal, price competition, technical capacity