Governance of Economic Spatial Initiatives

Announcing: Ampornstira, Fuangfa and John Walsh, “Governance of Economic Spatial Initiatives,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.1, No.3 (2017), pp.1-5.

Abstract:  The current Thai regime has emphasized the importance of special economic zones (SEZs) in border regions as a means of promoting overall economic development. The use of SEZs in this way has become popular throughout most of East Asia, with even North Korea participates, if a little warily. Governments seem to be attracted to these forms of spatial
initiative because they are able to enforce different forms of law within them, customarily privileging capital over labor, as well as because the example of China shows what kind of growth can be achieved without yielding round on democratization and personal and political liberties. They are technocratic solutions that have the support of important transnational organizations such as the Asian Development Bank and, also, the Chinese government and its
many currently compliant corporations, which have been involved with the North-South and East-West Economic Corridors and the Asian Highway Network. At the level of implementation, the creation of these schemes requires enforced purchase of land and involuntary migration of previous residents, which has led to armed resistance to projects from Myanmar to India and beyond. This raises numerous questions about the appropriate means of governing such areas in ways that are equitable and accountable. This paper uses a case study approach to highlight various governance models from different parts of the world and seeks to identify success factors that may or may not be transferable elsewhere. No single model, it is argued, will be successfully applied in every case, although principles of transparency and proper public consultation would always be welcome. Some policy implications and recommendations are drawn from the analysis.

Keywords: development, governance, policy, spatial initiatives, special economic zones

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Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.1, No.1 (2016)

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I now have the hard copy issue of the Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.1, No.1 (January-June, 2016), of which I am Chief Editor.

Here is the final able of contents:

Editorial                                                                                                             v

Executive Summary                                                                                      vi

Editor’s Introduction                                                                                   vii

Original Peer Reviewed Papers

High Performance Work Practices Facilitating Employee Engagement: A Study of PSUs in Delhi NCR – Pooja Misra and Jaya Gupta                                         1

Determinants of the Mobile Handset Purchase Decision of the Youth in NCR India – Archana Singh and Ritu Srivastava                                                       16

Factors Affecting Retailer Perceptions for the Sale of Snacking Products through Traditional Trade Retail Outlets in India – Gagan Katiyar            22

Space and Workplace Issues for Nepalese Female Entrepreneurs, Street Vendors and Employees – Reema Thakur                                                                   33

Identity and Integration in the Asia-Pacific Region through the Prism of Tourism: Taiwan and Japan – Lin Fan, Lavanchawee Sujarittanonta and Arunee Lertkornkitja                                                                                                                              44

Foreign Direct Investment in Cambodia’s Telecommunications Industry – Fuangfa Ampornstira                                                                                             55

Book Reviews

Going Universal: How 24 Developing Countries Are Implementing Universal Health Coverage Reforms from the Bottom up – Cotlear, Daniel, Somil Nagpal, Owen Smith, Ajay Tandon and Rafael Cortez by John Walsh                            65

Capitalism: A Ghost Story – Roy, Arundhati by John Walsh   67

Editorial Policies and Guidelines                                                     68

 

 

Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.1, No.1 (February, 2016)

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Volume 1, Number 1 of the Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research will be published in February, 2016 by Global College International, Kathmandu and the SIU Research Centre in Thailand, with myself as chief editor. ISSN: 2467-9356.

This is the table of contents of the first issue:

Foreword and Executive Producer by Prof. Dr. Karan Singh Thagunna  p.iii

Editor’s Introducion by John Walsh p.v

Original Articles

High Performance Work Practices Facilitating Employee Engagement: A Study of PSUs in Delhi NCR – Pooja Misra and Jaya Gupta pp.1 – 15
Determinants of the Mobile Handset Purchase Decision of the
Youth in NCR- India – Archana Singh and Ritu Srivastava pp.16 – 21
Factors Affecting Retailer Perceptions for the Sale of Snacking
Products through Traditional Trade Retail Outlets in India – Gagan Katiyar pp.22 – 32
Space and Workplace Issues for Nepalese Female Entrepreneurs,
Street Vendors and Employees – Reema Thakur pp.33 – 43
Identity and Integration in the Asia-Pacific Region through the
Prism of Tourism: Taiwan & Japan – Lin Fan, Lavanchawee
Sujarittanonta and Arunee Lertkornkitja pp.44 – 54
Foreign Direct Investment in Cambodia’s Telecommunications
Industry – Fuangfa Ampornstira pp.55 – 64

Book Reviews
Going Universal: How 24 Developing Countries Are Implementing
Universal Health Coverage Reforms from the Bottom up – Cotlear, Daniel, Somil Nagpal, Owen Smith, Ajay Tandon and Rafael Cortez by John Walsh pp.65 – 66
Capitalism: A Ghost Story – Roy, Arundhati by John Walsh pp.67 – 68

Guidelines for Authors pp.69-70.

Please consider the double-blind peer-reviewed hard copy journal the Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research as a venue for your research paper. Submit to njmsr@gci.edu.np or directly to the editor (jcwalsh@siu.ac.th).

Conference Report: 5th International Conference on Management, Finance and Entrepreneurship and the 8th International Conference on Economics and Social Sciences

5th International Conference on Management, Finance and Entrepreneurship and the 8th International Conference on Economics and Social Sciences

Shinawatra University, BBD Building, 197, Viphawadi-Rangsit Road, Bangkok, June 6th, 2015

The occasion of the 5th International Conference on Management, Finance and Entrepreneurship and the 8th International Conference on Economics and Social Sciences, held at the Graduate Campus of Shinawatra University in Bangkok on June 6th, 2015, marked the continued partnership between the University and the International Foundation for Research and Development (ifrnd.org). Other partners include the Yildirim Beyazit Universiti of Turkey, Pertre Anderi of IASI, Romania, Durban University of Technology, South Africa and NAM, Ukraine.

The conference was held on the fourth floor of the graduate campus, as a number of other international conferences have also been held. This was a well-attended event with representatives from universities in Thailand, Indonesia, Myanmar, Malaysia, Oman, South Africa and the USA.

The keynote speech was given by Dr. Herman Gruenwald, from Burapha University, Chonburi, who spoke on the subject of entrepreneurship and how to encourage it. Subsequent speakers considered a wide range of topics. Some of the highlights included Abdalla M Omezzine (University of Nizwa) on “Supply Chain Management and Rejuvenation of Value Addition: the Case of Date Palm in the MENA Region,” Nsizwazikhona Chili Simon (Durban University of Technology) on “Township Tourism: The Politics and Socio-Economic Dynamics of Tourism in the South African Township: Umlazi, Durban” and Suthathip Yaisawarng (Union College, NY) on “Financial and Social Efficiency of Microfinance Institutions.”

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Figure 1: Audience Members Listen to a Presentation; source: Editor

Shinawatra University was again well-supported by the School of Liberal Arts, led by professors Kantatip Sinhaneti and Amporn Sai-Ngiamvibool and their students, together with faculty members Steve McKee, Catherine Owens and Robert Burgess. Within the School of Management, papers were given (with my co-authorship) by a number of faculty members, doctoral candidates and MBA students.

Ajarn Lavanchawee Sujarittanonta spoke on the subject of “Breaking Gender Stereotypes in Asia: Human Resource Development Challenges for Thailand’s Police Force.” Dr. Wilaiporn Lao-Hakosol gave a presentation on “Sustainable Growth Strategies for 999 Company in the Era of the ASEAN Economic Community: Medical Equipment and Supplies Trading in Thailand during Changing Environmental Conditions.”

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Figure 2: Dr. Wilaiporn Lao-Hakosol Gives Her Presentation; source: Editor

Dr. Fuangfa Ampornstira presented “Possible Impacts of the Sino-Thai Kra Isthmus.” Mr. Eric Bediako spoke on the subject of “Accountancy and Sustainable Economic Development: A Case Study of Thailand.” Mr. Ashraful Siddique gave his presentation on “A Qualitative Analysis of Current Unrest in the Ready Made Garment Sector Concerning Labour Practices in Bangladesh.” Ms. Ingyin Khaing Tin presented her research on “Work Life Balance of Women in Mandalay, Myanmar.” Phramaha Min Putthithanasombat spoke on the subject of “Monk Travellers: Spreading the Opportunity to Do Good under Theravadin Buddhism.” Finally, Ms. Sirirat Ngamsang presented “The Sino-Thai Relationship in the Context of Various Perspectives of International Relations.”

Conferences such as this provide excellent opportunities for faculty members and students to network with each other, to listen to the research that colleagues are doing and to interact with those speakers, as well as having the chance to benchmark the level of their own work with that of others. I encourage my students to present at conferences and submit papers to journals as much as they can, in part because that is a graduation requirement but, also, because it enhances the educational experience and their personal level of confidence. I hope to continue to help organize more conferences here at Shinawatra University for these reasons and also to help propagate the idea of research-based discourse and policy formation.

Possible Impacts of the Sino-Thai Kra Isthmus Canal

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Possible Impacts of the Sino-Thai Kra Isthmus Canal

Fuangfa Ampornstira and John Walsh

This paper will be presented at the forthcoming IFRD Conference.

Abstract

Discussions continue as to whether a canal should be dug across the Kra Isthmus in southern Thailand, thereby enabling ships to bypass the Straits of Malacca. This would have considerable implications for shipping and for security for the region, not least for China’s energy security. Consequently, it is not surprising to find that the Chinese government has been involved in negotiations as to where and how it should be built, together with the issue of who should pay for the project. The construction would have numerous impacts on the economy and society of southern Thailand and of the region more widely and some of these are more predictable than others. This paper explores the likely impacts of the announcement of such a project and the unfolding events as they might occur. Comparable examples are sought, including the cases from Latin America. Some recommendations are drawn from the analysis.

Keywords: canal, China, Kra Isthmus, security, Thailand

Fuangfa Ampornstira is a faculty member of the School of Management, Shinawatra University, Thailand

Dr. John Walsh is Director, SIU Research Centre, School of Management, Shinawatra University, Thailand

Prospects for the Kra Isthmus Canal

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Ampornstira, Fuangfa and John Walsh, “Prospects for the Kra Isthmus Canal,” paper to be presented at the International Conference on Commerce, Financial Markets and Corporate Governance/2nd International Conference on Research Methods in Management and Social Sciences (Shinawatra University, Thailand: February 7th, 2015).

Abstract

Plans have been drawn up to dig a canal across the Kra isthmus in southern Thailand for centuries, most notably during the period of European colonization. The benefits of such a canal are plain, since it would greatly reduce shipping costs and enable vessels to avoid the Straits of Melaka. This latter point makes the project particularly attractive to the Chinese government, because it would provide an option to import vital resources such as oil in waters that are not wholly controlled by the US naval forces. It would further strategic Chinese interests that have been shown in the String of Pearls policy and the Nicaraguan canal. However, significant problems remain before the Kra isthmus canal can be built. These include diplomatic issues and ongoing security issues, as well as the formidable engineering concerns. Further, there are the local concerns among the residents who would be affected by construction and would be forced to leave their homes and employment. Other social forces will also come into play. This paper explores in brief the history of the idea of the Kra isthmus canal and then analyses the various issues that currently require to be resolved before the earth can be broken.

Keywords: China, international relations, Kra isthmus, shipping, Thailand

Mobile Telecommunications in Cambodia: Aspects of Competition and Consumer Behaviour

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Announcing: Amponsitra, Fuangfa and John Walsh, “Mobile Telecommunications in Cambodia: Aspects of Competition and Consumer Behaviour,” Pacific Business Review, Vol.7, No.4 (October, 2014), pp.103-, available at: http://pbr.co.in/October2014/15.pdf.

Abstract: Once Cambodia opened its economy for international investment and businness, many companies entered promising sectors as competition flourished and, in some cases, became destructively intense. This has occurred in the mobile telecommunications industry, which the Cambodian government opened freely to international investors because it realized the importance to economic development of national broadband infrastructure but lacked the resources to build it. This paper explores the interaction between the services provided under these conditions of competition and those which are demanded by consumers through a quantitative survey of 400 respondents in four different urban environments. It is shown that there is a discrepancy between the cost-based offerings generally available and the network externality benefits in which consumers are most interested.