Does the Tourism Industry Create Decent Work?

Walsh, John, “Does the Tourism Industry Create Decent Work?” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.1, No.4 (June, 2017), pp.13-20, available at: http://crcltd.org/images/Does_the_Tourism_Industry_Create_Decent_Work.PDF.

Abstract: It is generally accepted that the development of the tourism industry helps in
providing more jobs for local people and, hence, better income generation and prospects for economic development. Yet it has been shown that most new jobs in the tourism industry are low-skilled and low-salary in nature. Indeed, the negative externalities often associated with investment in the tourism industry, particularly in the Mekong Region but also elsewhere, result in jobs associated with demeaning and dangerous activities (e.g. Sex work industry and drugs peddling). Unless it is clear what kinds of jobs will be created by development in tourism, it will be impossible for government agencies to plan for future changes in the labour market and to the need for public services in the future. This paper examines the evidence for job creation in different parts of the world and estimates how this will apply to tourism development in Thailand. The limitations of this approach are explored and suggestions made as to future research necessary to improve the quality of labour market planning in this regard.
Key words: Decent work, labour market, Thailand, tourism, Economy

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A Study of Tourism’s Contribution to the Textile and Clothing Industry: International Consumer Buying Behaviour in Thailand

Yan, Zeng and John Walsh, “A Study of Tourism’s Contribution to the Textile and Clothing Industry: International Consumer Buying Behaviour in Thailand,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.1, No.2 (2017), available at: http://crcltd.org/images/A_Study_of_Tourism_s_Contribution_to_the_Textile_and_Clothing_Industry_International_Consumer_Buying_Behavior_in_Thailand%20(1).PDF.

Abstract:

This paper is aimed at exploring the impact of international tourism huge value consumption concerning the development of T&C (textile and clothing) industry in Thailand. The underlying concept is that stimulating the influencing factors of international consumer buying behavior will be another important “export” driving power. This study employs a quantitative approach to investigate the relationship between the three factors and T&C expenditure with respect to international tourist in a sample of tourist in Bangkok. The study concludes that tourism industry has significant impact on this T&C industry and marketing promotion or strategy will be important. It further concludes that the tourism industry will contribute to the development of T&C industry since the visitor export is increasing continuously in Thailand. Keywords: Service quality, SERVQUAL, Customer satisfaction, consumer behavior, Textile

The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak

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Announcing:

Apivantanaporn, Thanan and John Walsh, “The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak,” Quaestus, Vol.9 (June, 2016), pp.9-20, available at: http://www.quaestus.ro/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/walsh.pdf.

Abstract:

Low carbon tourism management appears to be a contradictory concept. After all, tourism involves travel for purposes of leisure and recreation and that travel, under current technological conditions, inevitably produces carbon emissions. This is quite in addition to the environmental consequences of actions taken in the tourism resort destination or destinations. However, there are actions that can be taken to mitigate negative environmental consequences and some which can even aspire to have a negative overall effect on carbon emissions. Many of these activities take place on the supply side of the tourism industry, such as local sourcing of food and beverage items, locally-produced goods and services and minimally invasive architecture and development. This paper explores the nature of low carbon tourism destination management and highlights the more practical and valuable applications in the context of the low carbon campaign being organized by the Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Association (DASTA) in Thailand, with a particular focus on the case study island of Koh Mak. Various recommendations are made in the light of the analysis and the implications of preparing low carbon tourism destination activities on a small island are considered. Keywords: destination management, low carbon tourism management, island, Thailand, tourism

Evaluation of the Institutional Approach to Tourism in Thailand

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Last week I attended the Fourth International Conference on Hospitality and Tourism Management held at the Lotus Bangkok Hotel here in the City of Angels (more details at: http://tourismconference.co/). It went well and I presented this paper:

EVALUATION OF THE INSTITUTIONAL APPROACH TO TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN THAILAND

Thanan Apivantanaporn and John Walsh (corresponding author)

Shinawatra University, Thailand

Abstract

It is not by accident that tourism has become a leading element in the economic development of Thailand. Although tourism relies principally upon the private sector, it has been significantly supported by public sector agencies, principally the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT). The TAT has designed various strategies to promote Thailand as a destination overall and in terms of specific sites within the country. Its attention has also been directed towards the promotion of domestic tourism through the creative city concept and, with the assistance of Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Authority (DASTA), the low carbon tourism concept. Other government agencies have assisted in the promotion of health tourism and it is possible that the special economic zone and industrial cluster policies will also have an impact on tourism development. At a time when the rest of the economy is faltering, tourism has become even more important and it is necessary to understand how policy for tourism development is evolving to deal with changing circumstances. This paper aims to document and evaluate tourism development policy in Thailand by identifying the institutions involved in formulating and enacting such policy and evaluating both the projects and plans involved and the implementation of them. Policy recommendations are drawn from the analysis.

Keywords: economic development, institutions, public sector, Thailand, tourism 

 

Destination Management of Small Islands: The Case of Koh Mak

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Announcing: Walsh, John and Thanan Apivantanaporn, “Destination Management of Small Islands: The Case of Koh Mak,” Acta Universitatis Danubius Oeconomica, Vol.11, No.3 (June, 2015), available at: http://journals.univ-danubius.ro/index.php/oeconomica/article/view/2787.

Abstract: Koh Mak is a small island in the Gulf of Thailand that is usually visited by tourists as part of a multi-destination tour. It differentiates itself from its neighbours by being positioned as a quiet, family-based location that utilizes a low-carbon strategy. However, it is not currently clear how effective this strategy is. Islands tend to be successful in terms of destination management when they have a diversified economy and some genuine social capital or relations with which visitors can establish a relationship. This is not evidently true for Koh Mak but it might be true if the island can be considered part of a multi-island cluster. This paper uses qualitative research to explore the opinions of tourists and long-stay residents about their experiences on the island and then tests whether existing models of island tourism are borne out in this case. It is found that the current positioning is somewhat contradictory and inevitably limited in time because increasing numbers of tourists will serve to damage and then destroy those attributes which are being promoted.

 

The full text does not seem to be available yet but hopefully it soon will be.

 

The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak

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The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak

Thanan Apivantanaporn and John Walsh

To be presented at the forthcoming IFRD Conference.

Abstract

Low carbon tourism management appears to be a contradictory concept. After all, tourism involves travel for purposes of leisure and recreation and that travel, under current technological conditions, inevitably produces carbon emissions. This is quite in addition to the environmental consequences of actions taken in the tourism resort destination or destinations. However, there are actions that can be taken to mitigate negative environmental consequences and some which can even aspire to have a negative overall effect on carbon emissions. Many of these activities take place on the supply side of the tourism industry, such as local sourcing of food and beverage items, locally-produced goods and services and minimally invasive architecture and development. This paper explores the nature of low carbon tourism destination management and highlights the more practical and valuable applications in the context of the low carbon campaign being organized by the Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Association (DASTA) in Thailand, with a particular focus on the case study island of Koh Mak. Various recommendations are made in the light of the analysis and the implications of preparing low carbon tourism destination activities on a small island are considered.

Keywords: destination management, low carbon tourism management, island, Thailand, tourism

Thanan Apivantanaporn is a doctoral candidate at the School of Management, Shinawatra University, Thailand

Dr. John Walsh is Director, SIU Research Centre, School of Management, Shinawatra University, Thailand

Destination Management of Small Islands: The Case of Koh Mak

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Announcing: Walsh, John, “Destination Management of Small Islands: The Case of Koh Mak,” paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Economics and Social Sciences (Durban: June 21st-22nd, 2014).

Abstract:

Koh Mak is a small island in the Gulf of Thailand that is usually visited by tourists as part of a multi-destination tour. It differentiates itself from its neighbours by being positioned as a quiet, family-based location that utilizes a low-carbon strategy. However, it is not currently clear how effective this strategy is. Islands tend to be successful in terms of destination management when they have a diversified economy and some genuine social capital or relations with which visitors can establish a relationship. This is not evidently true for Koh Mak but it might be true if the island can be considered part of a multi-island cluster. This paper uses qualitative research to explore the opinions of tourists and long-stay residents about their experiences on the island and then tests whether existing models of island tourism are borne out in this case. It is found that the current positioning is somewhat contradictory and inevitably limited in time because increasing numbers of tourists will serve to damage and then destroy those attributes which are being promoted.

Keywords: destination management, islands, Thailand, tourism