Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia

The paper I gave at the Bangkok University conference on creative arts policy has now been published in the proceedings online:

Walsh, John, “Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia,” paper presented at the Bangkok University Communication Arts (BUCA) Creative Industries in Asia: Innovating within Constraints (Bangkok: July, 2016), available at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephen_Poon3/publication/307331561_The_Functions_Behind_Hand-Drawn_Typography_In_Human_Gestural_Replication/links/57c5062f08aeb0491435839e/The-Functions-Behind-Hand-Drawn-Typography-In-Human-Gestural-Replication.pdf.

Abstract:

One of the most important means by which the Republic of Korea (ROK) was able to escape
from the Middle Income Trap was through the creation and implementation of the Hallyu,
which was a wave of inter-related forms of cultural production supported and promoted by
government. Hallyu was successful, at least in part, because of the freedom of expression
won by the Korean people in the struggle for democracy. Its various forms, including popular
music, television, dance, food, cosmetics and other consumer goods can be complementary in
nature and were supported by various incentives, subsidies and other forms of industrial
policy. Some of these policies have been recreated for application in other countries of East
and Southeast Asia, while others have yet to be evaluated or adopted. In other cases, policies
have been employed which have actively constrained creativity, sometimes for justifiable
state-level reasons and sometimes not. This paper outlines the different forms of industrial
policy that have been employed to affect creative industries, inspired by the Korean example
and using Southeast Asia as the primary area of investigation. Implications are drawn from
the analysis as to which kinds of policies are likely to be successful in which kinds of policy
regimes and political systems. Social, cultural and religious constraints to the expression of
the creative industries in the region are also discussed and possibilities of change considered.
Keywords: creative industries, hallyu, industrial policy, Korea, Southeast Asia

Advertisements

Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia

banner

This is the paper that I will present at the Bangkok University Communication Arts International Conference Creative Industries in Asia: Innovating Within Constraints 1-2 July 2016, Bangkok, Thailand. More details here.

Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia

Abstract

One of the most important means by which the Republic of Korea (ROK) was able to escape from the Middle Income Trap was through the creation and implementation of the Hallyu, which was a wave of inter-related forms of cultural production supported and promoted by government. Hallyu was successful, at least in part, because of the freedom of expression won by the Korean people in the struggle for democracy. Its various forms, including popular music, television, dance, food, cosmetics and other consumer goods can be complementary in nature and were supported by various incentives, subsidies and other forms of industrial policy. Some of these policies have been recreated for application in other countries of East and Southeast Asia, while others have yet to be evaluated or adopted. In other cases, policies have been employed which have actively constrained creativity, sometimes for justifiable state-level reasons and sometimes not. This paper outlines the different forms of industrial policy that have been employed to affect creative industries, inspired by the Korean example and using Southeast Asia as the primary area of investigation. Implications are drawn from the analysis as to which kinds of policies are likely to be successful in which kinds of policy regimes and political systems. Social, cultural and religious constraints to the expression of the creative industries in the region are also discussed and possibilities of change considered.

Keywords: creative industries, hallyu, industrial policy, Korea, Southeast Asia

Integrated Water Resources Management in Thailand and Southeast Asia

Our proposal (that is, by doctoral candidate Alin Chintraruck and myself) was submitted to a new book project on Sustainable Development in Southeast Asia and it has been accepted. So we will be working over the next few months on a chapter for which this is the abstract:

Water resource management in Thailand is characterized by competition for scarce resources between industry, the tourist sector and public citizens, in a country in which environmental degradation and erratic climatic patterns are making the controlled flow of water increasingly difficult. Additional issues include the overlapping responsibilities and mandates of various government agencies, as well as the problems of pricing a common good under increasing market competition. The difficulties were made evident during the floods of 2011, in which more than 700 people were killed (and hundreds more in neighbouring countries), when the interests of industrial estate users were set against private citizens and the interests of neighbouring provinces set against those of Bangkok. An additional, complicating factor involves the connection between some aspects of water management with extra-judicial institutions which it is illegal to criticize. The incoming government survived the crisis this episode provoked and is currently seeking better means of enhancing water management and coordinating the different elements of that management across geographical and jurisdictional lines. However, the management model that is emerging from this process is fraught with pragmatic compromise and postponement or avoidance of power relations issues. This situation is relevant to other Southeast Asian nations both in terms of geographical and climatic pressures on water resources in rapidly industrializing and urbanizing states and also in terms of competing interests in conditions of constrained democracy. Where integrated management systems have been introduced quite successfully, as in Singapore, this has resulted from both transparency at the governmental level and unity of purpose in all relevant institutions. This chapter analyses Thailand’s current and prospective water management regimes in a comparative perspective and highlights what has and, more commonly, what has not worked well in previous attempts to deal with the issues involved.

 

 

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies (Southeast Asia)

I have been appointed editor of Emerald’s Emerging Market Case study series for Southeast Asia. That means I will be responsible for acquiring and getting published case studies from and about Southeast Asian business for inclusion at the Emerald website (http://emeraldinsight.com/products/case_studies/index.htm). If you are interested in submitting a case, please let me know.