Poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt: And Wilt Thou Leave Me Thus?

Sir Thomas Wyatt’s poem ‘And Wilt Thou Leave Me Thus?’ is a simple lyric that was intended to be sung to the accompaniment of one or more instruments and it tells a tale of such personal interest and immediacy that it is quite easy to imagine it being sung by a contemporary pop or RnB singer. The basic theme is ‘will you leave me like this? Please don’t’ – how many other songs have exactly this principal concern?

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Poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt: They Flee from Me that Sometime Did Me Seek

Sir Thomas Wyatt is one of the earliest English (rather than British in this  case) poets to write in a recognizably  modern style and approach. He lived from 1503-42 and during his life he was much  admired for his musical and martial prowess, as well as his personal beauty. As  a member of the court of King Henry VIII, he lived through a period of continued  upheaval and his sometimes tempestuous life mirrored that occurring in the  Kingdom as a whole.

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Appreciating Poetry: Form

The form of a poem means the way in which it is structured, the number of lines  in a stanza or verse, the number of verses in the poem overall and so forth.  There are several aspects to bear in mind when considering the form of a poem.  The first one is to identify the form of a particular poem. The second is to  compare the form of the poem considered with the forms of other poems and the  third part is to consider whether the choice of form adds to the value and  pleasure of the poem and, if so, in which way.

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Appreciating Poetry: Introduction

Appreciating poetry is not a skill that comes to many people automatically – instead, it is something that requires a measure of effort and patience.  However, it is certainly worthwhile. Poetry, good poetry at least, can distil  knowledge of the world in a way that helps readers to realize that other people  have the same feelings and experiences that we do or else provides a spark of  inspiration to help us make sense of the apparently cruel indifference of the  universe – other forms of philosophy are available, of course.

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Poetry of Blake: The New Jerusalem

Blake’s poem The New Jerusalem has become one of his most popular works, in large part because of the stirring music put to it by Sir Hubert Parry. It rings out on so many occasions, from church services to the entrance of the England cricket team. Indeed, the poem seems to have become inextricably linked with the nature of English-ness.

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Poetry of Blake: The Human Abstract

There are contradictions at the heart of just about every facet of the human experience. Nowhere is this more true than with religion or, at least, the Christian religion. Ask any person claiming to be a Christian if she is glad that Jesus was abandoned by all His friends and associates and then tortured to death and she is likely to say no.

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Poetry of Blake: A Warsong to Englishmen

English history is marked by the numbers of times that groups of men have been called together to fight, most commonly overseas with a view to conquest but within the country as well. English troops dominated Wales, Scotland and Ireland, as well as France and other parts of Europe and, in combination with imperial troops, allies and mercenaries, across the Americas, India and east Asia, Africa and Australasia.

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