SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017)

Welcome to the Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017) issue of the SIU Journal of Management, which is the double blind peer reviewed academic journal published here at Shinawatra University in Thailand. Download the full edition here (7.2. Final).

Here is this issue’s table of contents:

CONTENTS

Volume 7, Number 2, December, 2017
Editor’s Introduction 4

RESEARCH ARTICLES

1. Assessing the Operating efficiency of Vietnamese Microfinance Institutions and Its Implications for National Transformation – Pham Hong Linh and Nguyen Thi Thu Trang               7
2. Role of Emotional Intelligence in Organizational Citizenship Behaviour – Shameema Ferdausy, Anupam Kumar Das and Suchana Akhter             20
3. Entrepreneurship and Nation Building in a Changing Environment: Health Education Perspective – Afolabi Joseph Fasoranti                                        49
4 Team Learning in the Midst of Strategy: A Sun Tzu & Clausewitz Perspective from the 1996 Mount Everest Disaster – Ravee Phoewhawm                     64

CONFERENCE REPORTS

2nd International Conference on Recent Trends in Management                                                               91

BOOK REVIEWS

1. The Fire and the Tale by Giorgio Agamben – John Walsh  94
2. Adults in the Room by Yanis Varoufakis – John Walsh     96
3. Rebel Cities by David Harvey – John Walsh                   100

CALL FOR PAPERS                                                                 104

AUTHOR’S GUIDELINES                                                         106

ABOUT SHINAWATRA UNIVERSITY                                   109

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD                                            111

 

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Connectivity and the Healthcare Sector in Myanmar

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Announcing: Walsh, John, “Connectivity and the Healthcare Sector in Myanmar,” paper presented at the First Workshop of the Second Phase of ERIA Digital Economy, Innovation, and East Asia’s Competitiveness (January 21st-22nd, Bangkok).

I attended the first workshop of the second phase of ERIA’s project on the Digital Economy, Innovation and East Asia’s Competitiveness at the Westin Grande Sukhumvit Hotel, here in sunny Bangkok earlier this week. It went well. Here is my abstract:

One of the results of the long isolation of Myanmar and its people has been the way in which its healthcare industry has become obsolete and lacking in resources. Although wealthy Myanmar people have been able to travel to Thailand or Singapore for contemporary standards of healthcare for the last few years, this option has not been available for the majority of the people. Instead, they have been required to rely on low-cost options, such as the use of generic pharmaceutical products and traditional remedies, in the absence of affordable and high-quality local services. The issues are compounded by the absence of modern healthcare products, the inability of healthcare staff to learn from overseas sources and the limitations on modern communications on almost any subject. However, this situation is changing as the country is opening to the world and burgeoning connectivity is enhancing the ability of individuals and organizations to exchange information, travel and import equipment and expertise. Inevitably, the degree to which people are able to benefit from these changes is uneven because there is not an even distribution of the means of connectivity, i.e. infrastructure, education, market access and equipment. This paper reports on both qualitative and quantitative programmes of research aimed at identifying the different uses of ICT in improving connectivity in healthcare in Myanmar, featuring respondents in both the urban centre of Mandalay and in rural areas. The quantitative research will focus on the everyday life of people and the ways in which aspects of connectivity are incorporated within those lives with respect to various aspects of healthcare. The qualitative research will focus on personal interviews with a range of relevant stakeholders in activities relating to healthcare, including healthcare provision, use of medical laboratories, importing of healthcare equipment, pharmaceutical distribution and hospital management. The results of the research are added to already existing knowledge of Myanmar society to illustrate the nature of rapidly changing lives that are inequitably providing previously unavailable opportunities and aspirations. Some policy recommendations are drawn from the analysis.

Keywords: connectivity; healthcare; inequitable change; Myanmar; social change

The next workshop is likely to be in Indonesia in April, by which time a draft paper should be available for all participants.

The Basis of Industrial Policy

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Announcing:

Lao-Hakosol, Wilaiporn and John Walsh, “The Basis of Industrial Policy,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.2, No.1 (December, 2017), pp.31-7, available at: http://crcltd.org/Files/The_Basis_of_Industrial_policy.PDF.

Abstract:

This paper outlines the basis for industrial policy as part of the means by which statelevel developmental goals might be achieved. Some ideas are provided for bringing this basis up to date bearing in mind contemporary issues in the external environment.

Keywords: Policies, Industrial Policies, Framework, Components of policies, International Policies

Power and Technology in the Stargate Universe

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Announcing:

Sujarittanonta, Lavanchawee and John Walsh, “Technology and Power in the Stargate Universe,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.2, No.1 (December, 2017), pp.19-30, available at: http://crcltd.org/Files/Technology_and_change__To_improve_Myanmar.PDF.

Abstract: The central thematic act of Stargate takes place before the action begins: the death of the son of Colonel Jack O’Neill, which occurs when the boy accidentally shoots himself with his father’s service pistol. From the very beginning, technology is marked with certain characteristics that recur frequently through the unfolding narrative: it consists of a single, discrete item; it is portable; it has few if any positive externalities; it is either explicitly a weapon or has a direct military application; and it is lethally dangerous to those unprepared to deal with it. In subsequent events, O’Neill’s attempt to rewrite the past by plunging through the dangerous and unpredictable, womb-like nature of the Stargate so as to obtain such technological artifacts is of mixed success and, in due course, he retires to allow the next leader of SG-1, who has himself been physically regenerated by technology deemed appropriate to the societal level of earth, to demonstrate the positive externalities that such technology might provide. The new hero is met by a new threat: instead of the scavenger Goa’uld, whose use of technology is opportunistic and mostly uninventive, the Ori emerge as a set of powerful beings
bent on deliberately misrepresenting their technology as a means of power that combines the sacred and the magical. The new hero, Cameron Mitchell, demystifies the Stargate, calculating the exact number of times he passes through it and studying the past records relentlessly to learn all of the secrets that can be learned before explicitly accusing the Ori of their crime of obfuscation. Meanwhile, the central figures of Daniel Jackson and Samantha Carter have the role of uniting ancient knowledge with present learning and uniting unearthly technology with present earthly capability respectively. It is no surprise that both act most effectively when acting alone: the central vision of technology does not change. This paper traces the emergence of technology as a theme in the Stargate universe, primarily but not exclusively in the case of Stargate SG-1, while analyzing the ideological implications this has with respect to existing frameworks of the political economy of technology.
Keywords: Technology, Fictions, Stargate, Pplitical and Economical impacts, Practical emergence

Lifestyles of East Asia’s Nouveaux Riches

Announcing:

Ampornstira, Fuangfa and John Walsh, “Lifestyles of East Asia’s Nouveaux Riches,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.2, No.1 (December, 2017), pp.1-4, available at: http://crcltd.org/Files/Lifestyle_of_East_Asia_s_Nouveaux_Riches.PDF.

Abstract:

This short paper considers some of the implications of the lifestyles of Asia’s
nouveaux riches and how consumption opportunities and behaviour might change in the future.
Keywords: Lifestyle, Inheritence Riches, Culture, China

Review of Andy Weir’s Artemis

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Artemis

Andy Weir

New York, NY: Crown, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-525-57266-4

307 pp.

Andy Weir shot to fame as the result of his first book, The Martian, which became a best-seller as well as a prominent feature film. That book told the story of an unfortunate astronaut stranded on Mars when his colleagues were oblige to leave without him. The astronaut possesses reservoirs of scientific and technological knowledge and the ability to put this into useful practice through dexterity and clever innovation. The majority of the books as the man himself and his usually time-aspected rush to solve what appear to be impossibly difficult problems.

In Artemis, Weir attempts, not always successfully, to open the action to a small cast of characters, who revolve around the central character Jasmine or Jazz. Jazz is the daughter of a Saudi Arabian welder who has migrated to the eponymous city that is located on the moon. Artemis has reached the level of a modest-sized town, governed by a mayor and a man who is effectively the sheriff. Since it is very difficult to produce much in the way of consumer goods on the Moon, the citizens of Artemis are going to be reliant on imports from the Earth for the foreseeable future while being dependent on the tourism industry. It is clear from this that there is going to be a great deal of inequality in a society such as this and the signs of inequality will be evident in the possession of space and the items that be used to fill it. Jazz, of course, has very little space for herself and has also accumulated some unfortunate debts. Her answer to this predicament is to organize a modest but potentially lucrative smuggling ring. Alas, she is successful enough to reach the attention of people who can see a bigger picture and insert her into a scam which then drives the rest of the plot.

What is both the best and one of the worst things in the book is the relentless obsession with the science and engineering of living on the moon. No sentence is too short that three facts cannot be shoehorned into it and no conversation so inconsequential that it cannot be used as the vehicle for important technological knowledge:

“We reached the shelter hatch and I knocked on the small, round window. A face appeared – a man with watering eyes and ash-covered face. Most likely the foreman, who would have entered the shelter last. He gave me a thumbs-up and I returned the gesture (p.30).”

Not everyone will enjoy this style especially when it is combined with Jazz’s endless gag cracking (rather like Spiderman, whom one can imagine the author following) and the grotesquely simplistic characterisation of the remaining cast. To be honest, I am glad that I do not oblige myself to give a book marks out of ten on this site because I would have had to give quite a low one here – the dialogue is dreadful, the plot is ludicrous, the characters are irritatingly superficial and Jazz herself is the least credible female character I can remember encountering (and there have been quite a few unbelievable women in science fiction). However, the underlying nature of the book, which is an extended tour of how it would be possible to build and live in a moonbase, remains fascinating. The book would be better as a piece of fiction if it could have just involved an impersonal Jazz making a tour of Artemis while interacting with a computer but I imagine the publisher would not have been keen on such a thing. Instead, we are obliged to go along with the concept that technical competence is really the only characteristic that matters in valuing an individual and it is the principal means by which relationships may be maintained, damaged or repaired. Well, readers familiar with The Martian should know what to expect and would have no one to blame but themselves.

It will be interesting to see how, if at all, Weir develops his career from here. We have had Mars and the Moon so what will be next? A spaceship? A submarine marooned on the floor of the ocean? An asteroid? Perhaps he might be better advised to form a writing partnership (perhaps with a ghost writer – it has been known) as a means of combining the undoubted technical fireworks he has with a mode of fiction it is possible to enjoy in its own right.

Review of Stephen Baxter’s The Time Ships

The Time Ships
Stephen Baxter
London: HarperVoyager, 2016
ISBN: 978-0-00-813454-9
499 pp.

The prolific science fiction writer Stephen Baxter has become known not just for his own, numerous creations but, also, for his work in recreating classics of British work. He recently had published an updated version of The War of the Worlds and this, presumably, prompted the reissue of The Time Ships, which first appeared in 1995.

Baxter has produced a sequel to the Wells original which, it is hardly a spoiler to reveal, ends with our time travelling protagonist having to abandon his beloved but quite feckless Weena to the sinister and brutish Morlocks and their (Miltonesque) underground engines. The time traveller subsequently escaped a close shave with those creatures by escaping to the far future, where he witnessed what appears to be the onset of the end of the world or, at least, of the end of humanity before returning to his own time and relating the tale to the nameless Writer. Now, the Traveller prepares to return to the future, so to speak, with a view to rescuing Weena and finding some way of living happily ever after with her in some way. However, as the back cover blurb reveals, his first intervention in the chromosphere has rather upset things and a whole new series of timelines has been introduced The Traveller has the opportunity to travel unimaginable distances in time and to witness the different and mostly unfortunate ways in which his actions have changed humanity and the other creatures encountered along the way.

Baxter does a good job of portraying the Traveller as a stiff upper lip type of chap who would do sterling work in the administration of the Empire. The world is described through his perspective and, so, it appears as a potentially dangerous place which could, nevertheless, be wrestled into submission and put to productive use with a dose of elbow grease:

“… But I knew … that my 1891, that cosy world of Richmond Hill, was lost in the fractured Multiplicity.
Well: if I could not go home, I decided, I would go on: I would follow this road of Changing, until it could take me no further! (p.349)”

It would be a little unkind to observe that there is a gap between perception and reality such as this in nearly all of Baxter’s work – his characterisation has improved over the years and has become functional, although it is hard to imagine future PhD candidates will be probing the psychological makeup and development of his characters.

The class system is deftly deployed in the spirit of the original to display the true nature of society in its various guises and the Traveller’s inherent confidence in dealing with it in the many ages of the world he has the chance to visit.
Since the Traveller was to a significant extent responsible for the new universe of divided timelines and, perhaps more importantly, because through possession of his time machine he retains agency in seeking to affect the external universe, he is kept at the heart of events by the central figures of various eras who might, one might suspect, have reason rather to resent his continued presence. Just like Wells and his ambivalent attitude towards Britain’s place and behaviour in the world, Baxter, through the Traveller, exhibits little doubt that Britain nevertheless has the central role to play in the disposition of global events. It is interesting to compare this belief with those attitudes of the others who comes to us through the prism of the Traveller’s eyes. This is all quite nicely and subtly done.

I cannot help but think that Wells would be somewhat appalled by the world today – mendacity, spiteful divisiveness, the idiocy of Brexit, all of the contemporary phenomena that destroy the sense of solidarity on which he would (class system notwithstanding) have based society. What would he make of this book? Presumably he would have been disappointed that, a century later, it would still be necessary to write it. To write about time travel in the way that he did was to call for changes to the future that he foresaw (among the Eloi and the Morlocks, which one was the bourgeoisie? An argument could be made either way). Since then, the course has been set errantly and now it might be said that we appear to be heading to hell in a handcart. Baxter, characteristically, deploys his big picture technology to address this problem using concepts not available to Wells. The approach is satisfying and the result a worthy tribute to the great man.

Peer Reviewing 2017

Peer Reviewing

Eight times for the Journal of Economics, Management and Trade

Fifteen times for the African Journal of Business and Management

Issues in Business Management and Economics

Three times for the African Journal of Marketing Management

Two times for Asian Journal of Economics, Business and Accounting

Three times for ICBMR (conference in Indonesia)

Asian Journal of Advances in Agricultural Research

Ten times for Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology

Asian Education and Development Studies

Archives of Current Research International

Twenty times for ICMC 2017

Six times for Acta Universitatis Danubius Oeconomica

Journal of Agriculture and Ecology Research International

Current Journal of Applied and Science and Technology

Two times Journal of Economics and International Finance

International Journal of Livestock Production

Five times for African Journal of Agricultural Research

European Journal of Family Business

Journal of Contemporary Asia

Advances in Research

Fifteen papers for ICMC Young Scholars award.

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance

Two times for Pertanika

Seven times for Journal of Perspectives on Development Policy in the Greater Mekong Region

Three papers for the 2018 AIB conference