SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017)

Welcome to the Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017) issue of the SIU Journal of Management, which is the double blind peer reviewed academic journal published here at Shinawatra University in Thailand. Download the full edition here (7.2. Final).

Here is this issue’s table of contents:

CONTENTS

Volume 7, Number 2, December, 2017
Editor’s Introduction 4

RESEARCH ARTICLES

1. Assessing the Operating efficiency of Vietnamese Microfinance Institutions and Its Implications for National Transformation – Pham Hong Linh and Nguyen Thi Thu Trang               7
2. Role of Emotional Intelligence in Organizational Citizenship Behaviour – Shameema Ferdausy, Anupam Kumar Das and Suchana Akhter             20
3. Entrepreneurship and Nation Building in a Changing Environment: Health Education Perspective – Afolabi Joseph Fasoranti                                        49
4 Team Learning in the Midst of Strategy: A Sun Tzu & Clausewitz Perspective from the 1996 Mount Everest Disaster – Ravee Phoewhawm                     64

CONFERENCE REPORTS

2nd International Conference on Recent Trends in Management                                                               91

BOOK REVIEWS

1. The Fire and the Tale by Giorgio Agamben – John Walsh  94
2. Adults in the Room by Yanis Varoufakis – John Walsh     96
3. Rebel Cities by David Harvey – John Walsh                   100

CALL FOR PAPERS                                                                 104

AUTHOR’S GUIDELINES                                                         106

ABOUT SHINAWATRA UNIVERSITY                                   109

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD                                            111

 

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Review of Andy Weir’s Artemis

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Artemis

Andy Weir

New York, NY: Crown, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-525-57266-4

307 pp.

Andy Weir shot to fame as the result of his first book, The Martian, which became a best-seller as well as a prominent feature film. That book told the story of an unfortunate astronaut stranded on Mars when his colleagues were oblige to leave without him. The astronaut possesses reservoirs of scientific and technological knowledge and the ability to put this into useful practice through dexterity and clever innovation. The majority of the books as the man himself and his usually time-aspected rush to solve what appear to be impossibly difficult problems.

In Artemis, Weir attempts, not always successfully, to open the action to a small cast of characters, who revolve around the central character Jasmine or Jazz. Jazz is the daughter of a Saudi Arabian welder who has migrated to the eponymous city that is located on the moon. Artemis has reached the level of a modest-sized town, governed by a mayor and a man who is effectively the sheriff. Since it is very difficult to produce much in the way of consumer goods on the Moon, the citizens of Artemis are going to be reliant on imports from the Earth for the foreseeable future while being dependent on the tourism industry. It is clear from this that there is going to be a great deal of inequality in a society such as this and the signs of inequality will be evident in the possession of space and the items that be used to fill it. Jazz, of course, has very little space for herself and has also accumulated some unfortunate debts. Her answer to this predicament is to organize a modest but potentially lucrative smuggling ring. Alas, she is successful enough to reach the attention of people who can see a bigger picture and insert her into a scam which then drives the rest of the plot.

What is both the best and one of the worst things in the book is the relentless obsession with the science and engineering of living on the moon. No sentence is too short that three facts cannot be shoehorned into it and no conversation so inconsequential that it cannot be used as the vehicle for important technological knowledge:

“We reached the shelter hatch and I knocked on the small, round window. A face appeared – a man with watering eyes and ash-covered face. Most likely the foreman, who would have entered the shelter last. He gave me a thumbs-up and I returned the gesture (p.30).”

Not everyone will enjoy this style especially when it is combined with Jazz’s endless gag cracking (rather like Spiderman, whom one can imagine the author following) and the grotesquely simplistic characterisation of the remaining cast. To be honest, I am glad that I do not oblige myself to give a book marks out of ten on this site because I would have had to give quite a low one here – the dialogue is dreadful, the plot is ludicrous, the characters are irritatingly superficial and Jazz herself is the least credible female character I can remember encountering (and there have been quite a few unbelievable women in science fiction). However, the underlying nature of the book, which is an extended tour of how it would be possible to build and live in a moonbase, remains fascinating. The book would be better as a piece of fiction if it could have just involved an impersonal Jazz making a tour of Artemis while interacting with a computer but I imagine the publisher would not have been keen on such a thing. Instead, we are obliged to go along with the concept that technical competence is really the only characteristic that matters in valuing an individual and it is the principal means by which relationships may be maintained, damaged or repaired. Well, readers familiar with The Martian should know what to expect and would have no one to blame but themselves.

It will be interesting to see how, if at all, Weir develops his career from here. We have had Mars and the Moon so what will be next? A spaceship? A submarine marooned on the floor of the ocean? An asteroid? Perhaps he might be better advised to form a writing partnership (perhaps with a ghost writer – it has been known) as a means of combining the undoubted technical fireworks he has with a mode of fiction it is possible to enjoy in its own right.

Review of Stephen Baxter’s The Time Ships

The Time Ships
Stephen Baxter
London: HarperVoyager, 2016
ISBN: 978-0-00-813454-9
499 pp.

The prolific science fiction writer Stephen Baxter has become known not just for his own, numerous creations but, also, for his work in recreating classics of British work. He recently had published an updated version of The War of the Worlds and this, presumably, prompted the reissue of The Time Ships, which first appeared in 1995.

Baxter has produced a sequel to the Wells original which, it is hardly a spoiler to reveal, ends with our time travelling protagonist having to abandon his beloved but quite feckless Weena to the sinister and brutish Morlocks and their (Miltonesque) underground engines. The time traveller subsequently escaped a close shave with those creatures by escaping to the far future, where he witnessed what appears to be the onset of the end of the world or, at least, of the end of humanity before returning to his own time and relating the tale to the nameless Writer. Now, the Traveller prepares to return to the future, so to speak, with a view to rescuing Weena and finding some way of living happily ever after with her in some way. However, as the back cover blurb reveals, his first intervention in the chromosphere has rather upset things and a whole new series of timelines has been introduced The Traveller has the opportunity to travel unimaginable distances in time and to witness the different and mostly unfortunate ways in which his actions have changed humanity and the other creatures encountered along the way.

Baxter does a good job of portraying the Traveller as a stiff upper lip type of chap who would do sterling work in the administration of the Empire. The world is described through his perspective and, so, it appears as a potentially dangerous place which could, nevertheless, be wrestled into submission and put to productive use with a dose of elbow grease:

“… But I knew … that my 1891, that cosy world of Richmond Hill, was lost in the fractured Multiplicity.
Well: if I could not go home, I decided, I would go on: I would follow this road of Changing, until it could take me no further! (p.349)”

It would be a little unkind to observe that there is a gap between perception and reality such as this in nearly all of Baxter’s work – his characterisation has improved over the years and has become functional, although it is hard to imagine future PhD candidates will be probing the psychological makeup and development of his characters.

The class system is deftly deployed in the spirit of the original to display the true nature of society in its various guises and the Traveller’s inherent confidence in dealing with it in the many ages of the world he has the chance to visit.
Since the Traveller was to a significant extent responsible for the new universe of divided timelines and, perhaps more importantly, because through possession of his time machine he retains agency in seeking to affect the external universe, he is kept at the heart of events by the central figures of various eras who might, one might suspect, have reason rather to resent his continued presence. Just like Wells and his ambivalent attitude towards Britain’s place and behaviour in the world, Baxter, through the Traveller, exhibits little doubt that Britain nevertheless has the central role to play in the disposition of global events. It is interesting to compare this belief with those attitudes of the others who comes to us through the prism of the Traveller’s eyes. This is all quite nicely and subtly done.

I cannot help but think that Wells would be somewhat appalled by the world today – mendacity, spiteful divisiveness, the idiocy of Brexit, all of the contemporary phenomena that destroy the sense of solidarity on which he would (class system notwithstanding) have based society. What would he make of this book? Presumably he would have been disappointed that, a century later, it would still be necessary to write it. To write about time travel in the way that he did was to call for changes to the future that he foresaw (among the Eloi and the Morlocks, which one was the bourgeoisie? An argument could be made either way). Since then, the course has been set errantly and now it might be said that we appear to be heading to hell in a handcart. Baxter, characteristically, deploys his big picture technology to address this problem using concepts not available to Wells. The approach is satisfying and the result a worthy tribute to the great man.

Peer Reviewing 2017

Peer Reviewing

Eight times for the Journal of Economics, Management and Trade

Fifteen times for the African Journal of Business and Management

Issues in Business Management and Economics

Three times for the African Journal of Marketing Management

Two times for Asian Journal of Economics, Business and Accounting

Three times for ICBMR (conference in Indonesia)

Asian Journal of Advances in Agricultural Research

Ten times for Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology

Asian Education and Development Studies

Archives of Current Research International

Twenty times for ICMC 2017

Six times for Acta Universitatis Danubius Oeconomica

Journal of Agriculture and Ecology Research International

Current Journal of Applied and Science and Technology

Two times Journal of Economics and International Finance

International Journal of Livestock Production

Five times for African Journal of Agricultural Research

European Journal of Family Business

Journal of Contemporary Asia

Advances in Research

Fifteen papers for ICMC Young Scholars award.

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance

Two times for Pertanika

Seven times for Journal of Perspectives on Development Policy in the Greater Mekong Region

Three papers for the 2018 AIB conference

Book Reviews 2017

Book Reviews

Agamben, Giorgio, The Fire and the Tale, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017), pp.94-6, available at: https://jcwalsh.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/7-2-final.pdf.

Ali, Tariq, The Extreme Centre: A Warning, Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.2 (2017), pp.71-2, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/review-of-tariq-alis-the-extreme-centre/.

Austen, Jane, Northanger Abbey, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/12/07/review-of-northanger-abbey-by-jane-austen/.

Baxter, Stephen and Alastair Reynolds, The Medusa Chronicles, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/04/29/review-of-the-medusa-chronicles-by-baxter-and-reynolds/.

Chang, Ha-Joon and Ilene Grabel, Reclaiming Development: An Alternative Economic Policy Manual, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.1 (June, 2017), pp.103-7, available at: https://jcwalsh.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/chang.pdf.

Cheng, Joseph Y.S., The Use of Mao and the Chongqing Model, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.53-5, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/review-of-joseph-y-s-cheng-ed-s-the-use-of-mao-and-the-chongqing-model/.

Cornwell, Bernard, The Archer’s Tale, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/12/07/review-of-the-archers-tale-by-bernard-cornwell/.

Dick, Philip K., The Man in the High Castle, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/08/19/review-of-philip-k-dicks-the-man-in-the-high-castle/.

Gaiman, Neil, Norse Mythology, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/04/29/review-of-gaimans-norse-mythology/.

Hamilton, Peter F., Night without Stars, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/review-of-peter-f-hamiltons-night-without-stars/.

Hanley, Steve, The Big Midweek: Life inside The Fall, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/09/09/review-of-steve-hanleys-the-big-midweek/.

Harvey, David, Rebel Cities, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017), pp.100-3, available at: https://jcwalsh.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/7-2-final.pdf.

Honda, Tetsuya, The Silent Dead, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/04/29/review-of-tetsuya-hondas-the-silent-dead/.

Kawabata, Yasunari, The Old Capital, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/09/10/review-of-yasunari-kawabatas-the-old-capital/.

Leckie, Ann, Ancillary Justice, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/08/19/review-of-ann-leckies-ancillary-justice/.

Liu, Cixin, Death’s End, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/review-of-cixin-lius-deaths-end/.

McEwan, Ian, On Chesil Beach, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/review-of-ian-mcewans-on-chesil-beach/.

Morris, Marc, King John: Treachery, Tyranny and the Road to Magna Carta, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.58-61, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/review-of-marc-morriss-king-john/.

Munro, Alice, Open Secrets, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/08/19/review-of-alice-munros-open-secrets/.

Pasuk, Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Unequal Thailand: Aspects of Income, Wealth and Power, Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.2 (2017), pp.67-8, available at:

Piketty, Thomas, Chronicles on Our Troubled Times, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.1 (June, 2017), pp.96-9, available at: https://jcwalsh.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/piketty.pdf.

Reynolds, Alastair, Revenger, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/12/07/review-of-revenger-by-alastair-reynolds/.

Rice, Anne, Of Love and Evil, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/review-of-anne-rices-of-love-and-evil/.

Sassen, Saskia, Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.51-3, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/review-of-saskia-sassens-expulsions/.

Schlosser, Eric, Gods of Metal, Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.2 (2017), pp.69-70, available at:

Stross, Charles, Empire Games, Ladprao 64, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/05/20/review-of-charles-strosss-empire-games/.

Upreti, Bishnu Raj, Sagar Raj Sharma and Suman Babu Paudel, eds., Food Security in Post-Colonial Nepal, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.1 (June, 2017), pp.99-103, available at: https://jcwalsh.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/upreti.pdf.

Varoufakis, Yanis, Adults in the Room, SIU Journal of Management, Vol,7, No.2 (December, 2017), 96-100, available at: https://jcwalsh.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/7-2-final.pdf.

Zizek, Slavoj, Against the Double Blackmail: Refugees, Terror and Other Troubles with the Neighbours, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.55-8, available at: https://jcwalsh.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/review-of-slavoj-zizeks-against-the-double-blackmail/.

Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.3 (Sep-Dec, 2016)

Welcome to the Vol.3, No.3 (Sep-Dec, 2016) issue of the Journal of Shinawatra University. This is a double-blind peer-reviewed academic journal accepting papers in any field of scholarly endeavour.

Journal of Shinawatra University

Volume 3, Number 3, Sep-Dec, 2016

Table of Contents

Editor’s Introduction

Peer Reviewed Papers

The Ancient Economics of Japan: Criticizing the Economics Situations of Japan in Ancient time until Edo period – Sittichai Anantarangsi

Analysis on Present Situation in Tuanjie town Kunming for being a prototype of Agritainment mode – Yang Fang

Automation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution in Thailand: Evidence from the Automotive Industry – Somlerk Karnwiwat

 
Book Reviews

Society and Economy in Ancient Nepal by Prakash Narayan – John Walsh (download here: Narayan)

Democracy in What State? by Agamben, Giorgio, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaid, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Rancière, Kristin Ross and Slavoj Žižek – John Walsh (download here: Agamben)

Shan and Beyond: Essays on Shan Archaeology, Anthropology, History, Politics, Religion and Human Rights by Montira Rato and Khanidtha Kanthavichai, eds. – John Walsh (download here: Shan)

General Editorial Policies