SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017)

Welcome to the Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017) issue of the SIU Journal of Management, which is the double blind peer reviewed academic journal published here at Shinawatra University in Thailand. Download the full edition here (7.2. Final).

Here is this issue’s table of contents:

CONTENTS

Volume 7, Number 2, December, 2017
Editor’s Introduction 4

RESEARCH ARTICLES

1. Assessing the Operating efficiency of Vietnamese Microfinance Institutions and Its Implications for National Transformation – Pham Hong Linh and Nguyen Thi Thu Trang               7
2. Role of Emotional Intelligence in Organizational Citizenship Behaviour – Shameema Ferdausy, Anupam Kumar Das and Suchana Akhter             20
3. Entrepreneurship and Nation Building in a Changing Environment: Health Education Perspective – Afolabi Joseph Fasoranti                                        49
4 Team Learning in the Midst of Strategy: A Sun Tzu & Clausewitz Perspective from the 1996 Mount Everest Disaster – Ravee Phoewhawm                     64

CONFERENCE REPORTS

2nd International Conference on Recent Trends in Management                                                               91

BOOK REVIEWS

1. The Fire and the Tale by Giorgio Agamben – John Walsh  94
2. Adults in the Room by Yanis Varoufakis – John Walsh     96
3. Rebel Cities by David Harvey – John Walsh                   100

CALL FOR PAPERS                                                                 104

AUTHOR’S GUIDELINES                                                         106

ABOUT SHINAWATRA UNIVERSITY                                   109

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD                                            111

 

 

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Connectivity and Healthcare in Myanmar

I spent this weekend attending the ERIA Workshop on the Second Phase of the Project on the Digital Economy, Innovation and East Asia at the Westin Grande Sukhumvit Hotel here in sunny Bangkok. The weekend went well and 15 presentations were made overall. Now we will continue to produce the final versions of the papers which will be published as an ERIA report (http://www.eria.org/publications/) and possibly an edited book thereafter.

The abstract for my paper was:

Connectivity and the Healthcare Market in Myanmar

Abstract

One of the results of the long isolation of Myanmar and its people has been the way in which its healthcare industry has become obsolete and lacking in resources. Although wealthy Myanmar people have been able to travel to Thailand or Singapore for contemporary standards of healthcare for the last few years, this option has not been available for the majority of the people. Instead, they have been required to rely on low-cost options, such as the use of generic pharmaceutical products and traditional remedies, in the absence of affordable and high-quality local services. The issues are compounded by the absence of modern healthcare products, the inability of healthcare staff to learn from overseas sources and the limitations on modern communications on almost any subject. However, this situation is changing as the country is opening to the world and burgeoning connectivity is enhancing the ability of individuals and organizations to exchange information, travel and import equipment and expertise. Inevitably, the degree to which people are able to benefit from these changes is uneven because there is not an even distribution of the means of connectivity, i.e. infrastructure, education, market access and equipment. This paper reports on both qualitative and quantitative programmes of research aimed at identifying the different uses of ICT in improving connectivity in healthcare in Myanmar, featuring respondents in both the urban centre of Mandalay and in rural areas. The quantitative research will focus on the everyday life of people and the ways in which aspects of connectivity are incorporated within those lives with respect to various aspects of healthcare. The qualitative research will focus on personal interviews with a range of relevant stakeholders in activities relating to healthcare, including healthcare provision, use of medical laboratories, importing of healthcare equipment, pharmaceutical distribution and hospital management. The results of the research are added to already existing knowledge of Myanmar society to illustrate the nature of rapidly changing lives that are inequitably providing previously unavailable opportunities and aspirations. Some policy recommendations are drawn from the analysis.

Keywords: connectivity; healthcare; inequitable change; Myanmar; social change

Entrepreneurial Women in Lao People’s Democratic Republic

My paper with Dr. Nittana:

Southiseng, Nittana and John Walsh, “Entrepreneurial Women in Lao People’s Democratic Republic,” in Mehrangiz Najafizadeh and Linda L. Lindsey, eds., Women of Asia: Globalization, Development and Gender Equality (Routledge, 2018).

Is now avalailable for pre-order via Amazon (https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/toc/1138208787/ref=dp_toc?_encoding=UTF8&n=266239). Other book selling options are also available.

Abstract:

Women have long occupied entrepreneurial niches in the Lao economy and have helped to bridge the divide between subsistence agriculture and market-based activities and institutions. Recent research indicates that more women are entering into the formal or semi-formal business sector as owners or operators of micro or small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs). In addition to the usual problems relating to work-life balance and social pressures facing women in the labour market, Lao women also face problems of lack of support in terms of business services, lack of capital and business technique awareness. This paper investigates the situation facing Lao women in the workplace through a variety of case studies ranging from street vending, agriculture and manufacturing to services so as to develop a picture of a complex series of issues facing them. It is shown that women entering the labour market can have their familial and social relations significantly reconfigured and that survival and success require various interlinked strategies.

Keywords: entrepreneurs, labour markets, Lao PDR, social relations, women

Spatial Economic Initiatives in Thailand

The proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Thai Studies have now been published online (http://www.icts13.chiangmai.cmu.ac.th/list_proceeding.php). The proceedings include my paper ‘Spatial Economic Issues in Thailand.’

Abstract:

In common with other mainland Southeast Asian countries, Thailand has historically been dominated by a primate city, Bangkok, in which all principal economic, social, political, religious and monarchical institutions have been concentrated. Awareness of the problems that this concentration has caused
has been recognized in developmental plans since the 1950s, when efforts at decentralization were first introduced. Assisted by improvements in transportation infrastructure made during the Cold War period, initiatives such as the creation of the Northern Region Industrial Estate have been intended to develop other parts of the country to modify migration flows and reduce income inequalities which have become more marked through the years. The Board of Investment has been instrumental in offering incentives to foreign and domestic investors in industrial estates to the north of Bangkok in Pathum Thani and Ayutthaya, where good roads link the places of production with the markets of the capital and the main port of Laem Chabang. Currently, the border special economic
zone policy aims, insofar as its objectives have been coherently stated, to promote development in border regions which can take advantage of cross-border trade and investment. In these efforts, success has usually been achieved when public sector agencies have provided what private sector interests wanted and this is likely to continue in the future. This paper explores the various economic spatial initiatives that have taken place in the country and attempts to analyses when and where these have been successful and what lessons failures have been able to provide.

Keywords: Thailand, special economic zones, economic geography, regional development

Re-Imagining Marketing as Societing: A Critical Appraisal of Marketing in a Developing Country Context

Announcing the following new SCOPUS-listed journal paper:

Kashif, Muhammad, P.M.P. Fernando, Umair Altaf and John Walsh, “Re-Imagining Marketing as Societing: A Critical Appraisal of Marketing in a Developing Country Context,” Management Research Review, doi: https://doi.org/10.1108/MRR-04-2017-0118.

Abstract:

A purposive convenience sample of 40 professionals with diverse non-marketing backgrounds and of the widest possible demographic profile participated in in-depth, unstructured interviews. The content analysis and grounded theory method were used for the analysis.

Keywords:PakistanInterviewsMarketingGrounded theoryBusiness ethics and sustainabilityPublic imageTransformative power

Connectivity and the Healthcare Sector in Myanmar

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Announcing: Walsh, John, “Connectivity and the Healthcare Sector in Myanmar,” paper presented at the First Workshop of the Second Phase of ERIA Digital Economy, Innovation, and East Asia’s Competitiveness (January 21st-22nd, Bangkok).

I attended the first workshop of the second phase of ERIA’s project on the Digital Economy, Innovation and East Asia’s Competitiveness at the Westin Grande Sukhumvit Hotel, here in sunny Bangkok earlier this week. It went well. Here is my abstract:

One of the results of the long isolation of Myanmar and its people has been the way in which its healthcare industry has become obsolete and lacking in resources. Although wealthy Myanmar people have been able to travel to Thailand or Singapore for contemporary standards of healthcare for the last few years, this option has not been available for the majority of the people. Instead, they have been required to rely on low-cost options, such as the use of generic pharmaceutical products and traditional remedies, in the absence of affordable and high-quality local services. The issues are compounded by the absence of modern healthcare products, the inability of healthcare staff to learn from overseas sources and the limitations on modern communications on almost any subject. However, this situation is changing as the country is opening to the world and burgeoning connectivity is enhancing the ability of individuals and organizations to exchange information, travel and import equipment and expertise. Inevitably, the degree to which people are able to benefit from these changes is uneven because there is not an even distribution of the means of connectivity, i.e. infrastructure, education, market access and equipment. This paper reports on both qualitative and quantitative programmes of research aimed at identifying the different uses of ICT in improving connectivity in healthcare in Myanmar, featuring respondents in both the urban centre of Mandalay and in rural areas. The quantitative research will focus on the everyday life of people and the ways in which aspects of connectivity are incorporated within those lives with respect to various aspects of healthcare. The qualitative research will focus on personal interviews with a range of relevant stakeholders in activities relating to healthcare, including healthcare provision, use of medical laboratories, importing of healthcare equipment, pharmaceutical distribution and hospital management. The results of the research are added to already existing knowledge of Myanmar society to illustrate the nature of rapidly changing lives that are inequitably providing previously unavailable opportunities and aspirations. Some policy recommendations are drawn from the analysis.

Keywords: connectivity; healthcare; inequitable change; Myanmar; social change

The next workshop is likely to be in Indonesia in April, by which time a draft paper should be available for all participants.

The Basis of Industrial Policy

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Announcing:

Lao-Hakosol, Wilaiporn and John Walsh, “The Basis of Industrial Policy,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.2, No.1 (December, 2017), pp.31-7, available at: http://crcltd.org/Files/The_Basis_of_Industrial_policy.PDF.

Abstract:

This paper outlines the basis for industrial policy as part of the means by which statelevel developmental goals might be achieved. Some ideas are provided for bringing this basis up to date bearing in mind contemporary issues in the external environment.

Keywords: Policies, Industrial Policies, Framework, Components of policies, International Policies

Power and Technology in the Stargate Universe

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Announcing:

Sujarittanonta, Lavanchawee and John Walsh, “Technology and Power in the Stargate Universe,” International Review of Management and Development Studies, Vol.2, No.1 (December, 2017), pp.19-30, available at: http://crcltd.org/Files/Technology_and_change__To_improve_Myanmar.PDF.

Abstract: The central thematic act of Stargate takes place before the action begins: the death of the son of Colonel Jack O’Neill, which occurs when the boy accidentally shoots himself with his father’s service pistol. From the very beginning, technology is marked with certain characteristics that recur frequently through the unfolding narrative: it consists of a single, discrete item; it is portable; it has few if any positive externalities; it is either explicitly a weapon or has a direct military application; and it is lethally dangerous to those unprepared to deal with it. In subsequent events, O’Neill’s attempt to rewrite the past by plunging through the dangerous and unpredictable, womb-like nature of the Stargate so as to obtain such technological artifacts is of mixed success and, in due course, he retires to allow the next leader of SG-1, who has himself been physically regenerated by technology deemed appropriate to the societal level of earth, to demonstrate the positive externalities that such technology might provide. The new hero is met by a new threat: instead of the scavenger Goa’uld, whose use of technology is opportunistic and mostly uninventive, the Ori emerge as a set of powerful beings
bent on deliberately misrepresenting their technology as a means of power that combines the sacred and the magical. The new hero, Cameron Mitchell, demystifies the Stargate, calculating the exact number of times he passes through it and studying the past records relentlessly to learn all of the secrets that can be learned before explicitly accusing the Ori of their crime of obfuscation. Meanwhile, the central figures of Daniel Jackson and Samantha Carter have the role of uniting ancient knowledge with present learning and uniting unearthly technology with present earthly capability respectively. It is no surprise that both act most effectively when acting alone: the central vision of technology does not change. This paper traces the emergence of technology as a theme in the Stargate universe, primarily but not exclusively in the case of Stargate SG-1, while analyzing the ideological implications this has with respect to existing frameworks of the political economy of technology.
Keywords: Technology, Fictions, Stargate, Pplitical and Economical impacts, Practical emergence