Evaluation of the Institutional Approach to Tourism Policy Development: The Case of the Low Carbon Island Koh Mak, Thailand

Announcing:

Apivantanaporn, Thanan and John Walsh, “Evaluation of the Institutional Approach to Tourism Policy Development: The Case of the Low Carbon Island Koh Mak, Thailand,” International Journal of Development and Management Sciences, Vol.1, No.1 (December, 2016), pp.15-37, available at: http://crcltd.org/images/Evaluation%20of%20the%20Institutional%20Approach%20to%20Tourism%20Policy%20Development.pdf.

Abstract:

It is not by accident that tourism has become a leading element in the economic development of Thailand. Although tourism relies principally upon the private sector, it has been significantly supported by public sector agencies, principally the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT). The TAT has designed various strategies to promote Thailand as a destination overall and in terms of specific sites within the country. Its attention has also been directed towards the promotion of domestic tourism through the creative city concept and, with the assistance of Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Authority (DASTA), the low carbon tourism concept. Other government agencies have assisted in the promotion of health tourism and it is possible that the special economic zone and industrial cluster policies will also have an impact on tourism development. At a time when the rest of the economy is faltering, tourism has become even more important and it is necessary to understand how policy for tourism development is evolving to deal with changing circumstances. This paper aims to document and evaluate tourism development policy in Thailand by identifying the institutions involved in formulating and enacting such policy and evaluating both the projects and plans involved and the implementation of them. Policy recommendations are drawn from the analysis. Keywords: Economic Development, Institutions, Public Sector, Thailand, Tourism Policy

The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak

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Announcing:

Apivantanaporn, Thanan and John Walsh, “The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak,” Quaestus, Vol.9 (June, 2016), pp.9-20, available at: http://www.quaestus.ro/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/walsh.pdf.

Abstract:

Low carbon tourism management appears to be a contradictory concept. After all, tourism involves travel for purposes of leisure and recreation and that travel, under current technological conditions, inevitably produces carbon emissions. This is quite in addition to the environmental consequences of actions taken in the tourism resort destination or destinations. However, there are actions that can be taken to mitigate negative environmental consequences and some which can even aspire to have a negative overall effect on carbon emissions. Many of these activities take place on the supply side of the tourism industry, such as local sourcing of food and beverage items, locally-produced goods and services and minimally invasive architecture and development. This paper explores the nature of low carbon tourism destination management and highlights the more practical and valuable applications in the context of the low carbon campaign being organized by the Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Association (DASTA) in Thailand, with a particular focus on the case study island of Koh Mak. Various recommendations are made in the light of the analysis and the implications of preparing low carbon tourism destination activities on a small island are considered. Keywords: destination management, low carbon tourism management, island, Thailand, tourism

Evaluation of the Institutional Approach to Tourism in Thailand

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Last week I attended the Fourth International Conference on Hospitality and Tourism Management held at the Lotus Bangkok Hotel here in the City of Angels (more details at: http://tourismconference.co/). It went well and I presented this paper:

EVALUATION OF THE INSTITUTIONAL APPROACH TO TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN THAILAND

Thanan Apivantanaporn and John Walsh (corresponding author)

Shinawatra University, Thailand

Abstract

It is not by accident that tourism has become a leading element in the economic development of Thailand. Although tourism relies principally upon the private sector, it has been significantly supported by public sector agencies, principally the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT). The TAT has designed various strategies to promote Thailand as a destination overall and in terms of specific sites within the country. Its attention has also been directed towards the promotion of domestic tourism through the creative city concept and, with the assistance of Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Authority (DASTA), the low carbon tourism concept. Other government agencies have assisted in the promotion of health tourism and it is possible that the special economic zone and industrial cluster policies will also have an impact on tourism development. At a time when the rest of the economy is faltering, tourism has become even more important and it is necessary to understand how policy for tourism development is evolving to deal with changing circumstances. This paper aims to document and evaluate tourism development policy in Thailand by identifying the institutions involved in formulating and enacting such policy and evaluating both the projects and plans involved and the implementation of them. Policy recommendations are drawn from the analysis.

Keywords: economic development, institutions, public sector, Thailand, tourism 

 

Destination Management of Small Islands: The Case of Koh Mak

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Announcing: Walsh, John and Thanan Apivantanaporn, “Destination Management of Small Islands: The Case of Koh Mak,” Acta Universitatis Danubius Oeconomica, Vol.11, No.3 (June, 2015), available at: http://journals.univ-danubius.ro/index.php/oeconomica/article/view/2787.

Abstract: Koh Mak is a small island in the Gulf of Thailand that is usually visited by tourists as part of a multi-destination tour. It differentiates itself from its neighbours by being positioned as a quiet, family-based location that utilizes a low-carbon strategy. However, it is not currently clear how effective this strategy is. Islands tend to be successful in terms of destination management when they have a diversified economy and some genuine social capital or relations with which visitors can establish a relationship. This is not evidently true for Koh Mak but it might be true if the island can be considered part of a multi-island cluster. This paper uses qualitative research to explore the opinions of tourists and long-stay residents about their experiences on the island and then tests whether existing models of island tourism are borne out in this case. It is found that the current positioning is somewhat contradictory and inevitably limited in time because increasing numbers of tourists will serve to damage and then destroy those attributes which are being promoted.

 

The full text does not seem to be available yet but hopefully it soon will be.

 

The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak

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The Low Carbon Tourism Paradox: Evidence from Koh Mak

Thanan Apivantanaporn and John Walsh

To be presented at the forthcoming IFRD Conference.

Abstract

Low carbon tourism management appears to be a contradictory concept. After all, tourism involves travel for purposes of leisure and recreation and that travel, under current technological conditions, inevitably produces carbon emissions. This is quite in addition to the environmental consequences of actions taken in the tourism resort destination or destinations. However, there are actions that can be taken to mitigate negative environmental consequences and some which can even aspire to have a negative overall effect on carbon emissions. Many of these activities take place on the supply side of the tourism industry, such as local sourcing of food and beverage items, locally-produced goods and services and minimally invasive architecture and development. This paper explores the nature of low carbon tourism destination management and highlights the more practical and valuable applications in the context of the low carbon campaign being organized by the Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Association (DASTA) in Thailand, with a particular focus on the case study island of Koh Mak. Various recommendations are made in the light of the analysis and the implications of preparing low carbon tourism destination activities on a small island are considered.

Keywords: destination management, low carbon tourism management, island, Thailand, tourism

Thanan Apivantanaporn is a doctoral candidate at the School of Management, Shinawatra University, Thailand

Dr. John Walsh is Director, SIU Research Centre, School of Management, Shinawatra University, Thailand

Visitors’ Opinions of a Low Carbon Island Destination in Thailand

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Apivantanaporn, Thanan and John Walsh, “Visitors’ Opinions of a Low Carbon Island Destination in Thailand,” paper to be presented at the International Conference on Commerce, Financial Markets and Corporate Governance/2nd International Conference on Research Methods in Management and Social Sciences (Shinawatra University, Thailand: February 7th, 2015).

Abstract

The island destination Koh Mak is one of the tourist resorts selected by the Designated Areas for Sustainable Tourism Administration (DASTA) to undertake various activities as part of the low carbon concept. This represents one of several policy initiatives in Thailand to stimulate different parts of the country for tourism and different types of tourist interactions. Koh Mak is a small island in the Gulf of Thailand that is part of a chain of islands lined by a network of ferry services. Most of the land is owned by a small number of families who have generally agreed to maintain the island as a mostly quiet, family-based location without extensive exploitation or development. This paper resorts on results obtained from a survey of 400 holiday-makers on Koh Mak in a variety of demographic categories. The purpose of the survey was to identify levels of customer satisfaction and, also, the extent to which the brand image of Koh Mak meets the awareness and expectations of visitors as a low carbon destination. Both domestic and international students were included in the survey. The results are described in the context of DASTA’s efforts in promoting low carbon destinations and policy implications and recommendations are drawn from the results.

Keywords: DASTA, island tourism, low carbon tourism, sustainable development, Thailand

Academic Papers Published in 2013

It looks like the last of my 2013 academic papers has been published, so the full list as it stands is (in alphabetical order of authors):

Apivantanaporn, Thanan and John Walsh, “The Experience Economy in Thai Hotels and Resort Clusters: The Role of Authentic Food,” Acta Universitatus Danubius Oeconomica, Vol.9, No.3 (June, 2013), pp.140-52, available at: http://journals.univ-danubius.ro/index.php/oeconomica/article/view/1762/1606.

Chintraruck, Alin and John Walsh, “Contemporary Water Management Issues in Thailand in Comparative Perspective,” Journal of Social and Development Sciences, Vol.4, No.5 (May, 2013), pp.218-28, available at: http://www.ifrnd.org/admin/jsds/55.pdf.

Chintraruck, Alin and John Walsh, “Water Resource Allocation Issues in Thailand,” International Postgraduate Business Journal, Vol.5, No.1 (2013), pp.31-47, available at: http://www.oyagsb.uum.edu.my/images/IPBJ/list%20isue/2013_vol_5/artikal_jurnal_IPBJ_bab_2_1.pdf.

Ngamsang, Sirirat and John Walsh, “Confucius Institutes as Instruments of Soft Power: Comparison with International Rivals,” Journal of Educational and Vocational Research, Vol.4, No.10 (October, 2013), pp.302-10, available at: http://ifrnd.org/Research%20Papers/V4(10)4.pdf.

Putthithanasombat, Phramaha Min and John Walsh, “Management of Foreign Teachers in International Educational Institutes in Thailand,” Journal of Education and Vocational Research, Vol.4, No.8 (August, 2013), pp.230-7, available at: http://ifrnd.org/Research%20Papers/V4(8)3.pdf.

Southiseng, Nittana and John Walsh, “Human Resource Management in the Telecommunications Sector of Laos,” International Journal of Research Studies in Management, Vol.2, No.2 (2013), doi: 10.5861/ijrsm.2013.235, available at: http://www.consortiacademia.org/index.php/ijrsm/issue/current.

Sujarittanonta, Lavanchawee and John Walsh, “Game-Playing Culture in an Age of Capitalist Consumption: Young Taiwanese and Collectible Card Games,” Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, Vol.5, No.11 (November, 2013), pp.792-7, available at: http://ifrnd.org/Research%20Papers/J5(11)7.pdf.

Thakur, Reema and John Walsh, “Characteristics of Thai Women Entrepreneurs: A Case Study of SMEs Operating in Lampang Municipality Area,” Journal of Social and Development Studies, Vol.4, No.4 (April, 2013), pp.174-81, available at: http://ifrnd.org/admin/jsds/48.pdf.

Walsh, John and Fuengfa Amponsitra, “Infrastructure Development and the Repositioning of Power in Three Mekong Region Capital Cities,” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, early view, 10.1111/j.1468-2427.2013.01212.x, available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-2427/earlyview.

Walsh, John, “Environmental Changes in the Mekong Region and the Impact on Female Entrepreneurs,” Pacific Business Review: A Quarterly Journal of Management (February, 2013), available at: http://pbr.co.in/Vol%205%20Iss%208/3.pdf.

Walsh, John, “Fernando Enterprises: The Marketization of a Hobby,” South Asian Journal of Business and Management Cases, Vol.2, No.2 (December, 2013), pp.125-32.

Walsh, John, “Social Policy and Special Economic Zones in the Greater Mekong Subregion,” International Journal of Social Quality, Vol.3, No.1 (Summer, 2013), pp.44-56, http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/IJSQ.2013.030104. Abstract available at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/ijsq/2013/00000003/00000001/art00004.

Walsh, John, “Thailand and the East Asian Economic Model,” Pacific Business Review: A Quarterly Journal of Management, Vol.5, No.10 (April, 2013), pp.81-8, available at: http://pbr.co.in/Vol%205%20Iss%2010/11.pdf.

Walsh, John, “The Role of Clinical Governance and in the Health Management Systems of Thailand,” Journal of Social and Development Sciences, Vol.4, No.10 (October, 2013), pp.461-6, available at: http://ifrnd.org/Research%20Papers/S4(10)3.pdf.

Yin, Lay Su and John Walsh, “Performance Assessment in the International Hotel Sector of Yangon, Myanmar,” Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, Vol.5, No.5 (May, 2013), pp.282-90, available at: http://www.ifrnd.org/admin/jebs/66.pdf.