Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia

The paper I gave at the Bangkok University conference on creative arts policy has now been published in the proceedings online:

Walsh, John, “Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia,” paper presented at the Bangkok University Communication Arts (BUCA) Creative Industries in Asia: Innovating within Constraints (Bangkok: July, 2016), available at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephen_Poon3/publication/307331561_The_Functions_Behind_Hand-Drawn_Typography_In_Human_Gestural_Replication/links/57c5062f08aeb0491435839e/The-Functions-Behind-Hand-Drawn-Typography-In-Human-Gestural-Replication.pdf.

Abstract:

One of the most important means by which the Republic of Korea (ROK) was able to escape
from the Middle Income Trap was through the creation and implementation of the Hallyu,
which was a wave of inter-related forms of cultural production supported and promoted by
government. Hallyu was successful, at least in part, because of the freedom of expression
won by the Korean people in the struggle for democracy. Its various forms, including popular
music, television, dance, food, cosmetics and other consumer goods can be complementary in
nature and were supported by various incentives, subsidies and other forms of industrial
policy. Some of these policies have been recreated for application in other countries of East
and Southeast Asia, while others have yet to be evaluated or adopted. In other cases, policies
have been employed which have actively constrained creativity, sometimes for justifiable
state-level reasons and sometimes not. This paper outlines the different forms of industrial
policy that have been employed to affect creative industries, inspired by the Korean example
and using Southeast Asia as the primary area of investigation. Implications are drawn from
the analysis as to which kinds of policies are likely to be successful in which kinds of policy
regimes and political systems. Social, cultural and religious constraints to the expression of
the creative industries in the region are also discussed and possibilities of change considered.
Keywords: creative industries, hallyu, industrial policy, Korea, Southeast Asia

Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia

I attended the Bangkok University Communication Arts International Conference Creative Industries in Asia: Innovating within Constraints, 1st-2nd July 2016, which was succesfully held here in Bangkok. More details on the conference are available here.

My paper was entitled “Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia,” and here is the:

Abstract

One of the most important means by which the Republic of Korea (ROK) was able to escape from the Middle Income Trap was through the creation and implementation of the Hallyu, which was a wave of inter-related forms of cultural production supported and promoted by government. Hallyu was successful, at least in part, because of the freedom of expression won by the Korean people in the struggle for democracy. Its various forms, including popular music, television, dance, food, cosmetics and other consumer goods can be complementary in nature and were supported by various incentives, subsidies and other forms of industrial policy. Some of these policies have been recreated for application in other countries of East and Southeast Asia, while others have yet to be evaluated or adopted. In other cases, policies have been employed which have actively constrained creativity, sometimes for justifiable state-level reasons and sometimes not. This paper outlines the different forms of industrial policy that have been employed to affect creative industries, inspired by the Korean example and using Southeast Asia as the primary area of investigation. Implications are drawn from the analysis as to which kinds of policies are likely to be successful in which kinds of policy regimes and political systems. Social, cultural and religious constraints to the expression of the creative industries in the region are also discussed and possibilities of change considered.

Keywords: creative industries, hallyu, industrial policy, Korea, Southeast Asia

The full-text paper has been submitted and the proceedings are being prepared for publication even as we speak.

Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia

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This is the paper that I will present at the Bangkok University Communication Arts International Conference Creative Industries in Asia: Innovating Within Constraints 1-2 July 2016, Bangkok, Thailand. More details here.

Creative Industries and Industrial Policy in Korea and Southeast Asia

Abstract

One of the most important means by which the Republic of Korea (ROK) was able to escape from the Middle Income Trap was through the creation and implementation of the Hallyu, which was a wave of inter-related forms of cultural production supported and promoted by government. Hallyu was successful, at least in part, because of the freedom of expression won by the Korean people in the struggle for democracy. Its various forms, including popular music, television, dance, food, cosmetics and other consumer goods can be complementary in nature and were supported by various incentives, subsidies and other forms of industrial policy. Some of these policies have been recreated for application in other countries of East and Southeast Asia, while others have yet to be evaluated or adopted. In other cases, policies have been employed which have actively constrained creativity, sometimes for justifiable state-level reasons and sometimes not. This paper outlines the different forms of industrial policy that have been employed to affect creative industries, inspired by the Korean example and using Southeast Asia as the primary area of investigation. Implications are drawn from the analysis as to which kinds of policies are likely to be successful in which kinds of policy regimes and political systems. Social, cultural and religious constraints to the expression of the creative industries in the region are also discussed and possibilities of change considered.

Keywords: creative industries, hallyu, industrial policy, Korea, Southeast Asia

Creative Industries and Urban Structure: Seoul and Bangkok

Announcing: Techavimol, Pawana and John Walsh, “Creative Industries and Urban Structure: Seoul and Bangkok,” Elixir Journal, 36 (July, 2011), pp.3171-6. Available at: http://www.elixirjournal.org/user_articles/1309520482_36%20(2011)%203171-3176.pdf.

Abstract:
As states look to move towards the knowledge-based economy as a means of prolonging competitive advantages first obtained from labour-intensive, export-oriented manufacturing, the role of creative industries becomes increasingly important. These industries are variously defined and may be problematic in terms of their actual contribution to the overall economy but, nevertheless, facilitating their smooth functioning is held to be one of the state’s principal economic roles in the years ahead. This requires the creation of a form or forms of infrastructure that will support the creative industries and the fostering of links between them and the education system and labour market, such that the latter produce what is required by the former. The city in East Asia which has most consciously and actively pursued the means of causing the growth of creative industries is Seoul. This has necessitated the creation and implementation of a wide range of policies, in addition to affecting the physical growth of the city. As the authorities of Thailand’s city Bangkok look to the next round of growth beyond the East Asian Economic Model, the example of Seoul burns brightly. Yet there are various problems in following the Seoul example, ranging from the nature of the education system, the inability of metropolitan authorities to separate politics from planning decisions and the persistence of the value of low-labour cost manufacturing operations. This paper evaluates the nature of the Seoul model and the implications this has for the recreation of Bangkok in an environment in which the entire city may have to be abandoned to the elements.

Creative Industries and Urban Structure: Seoul and Bangkok

Announcing:

Techavimol, Pawana and John Walsh, “Creative Industries and Urban Structure: Seoul and Bangkok,” paper presented at the 4th International Colloquium on Business and Management (Bangkok: January, 2011).

Abstract:

As states look to move towards the knowledge-based economy as a means of prolonging competitive advantages first obtained from labour-intensive, export-oriented manufacturing, the role of creative industries becomes increasingly important. These industries are variously defined and may be problematic in terms of their actual contribution to the overall economy but, nevertheless, facilitating their smooth functioning is held to be one of the state’s principal economic roles in the years ahead. This requires the creation of a form or forms of infrastructure that will support the creative industries and the fostering of links between them and the education system and labour market, such that the latter produce what is required by the former. The city in East Asia which has most consciously and actively pursued the means of causing the growth of creative industries is Seoul. This has necessitated the creation and implementation of a wide range of policies, in addition to affecting the physical growth of the city. As the authorities of Thailand’s city Bangkok look to the next round of growth beyond the East Asian Economic Model, the example of Seoul burns brightly. Yet there are various problems in following the Seoul example, ranging from the nature of the education system, the inability of metropolitan authorities to separate politics from planning decisions and the persistence of the value of low-labour cost manufacturing operations. This paper evaluates the nature of the Seoul model and the implications this has for the recreation of Bangkok in an environment in which the entire city may have to be abandoned to the elements.