Book Reviews 2017

Book Reviews

Agamben, Giorgio, The Fire and the Tale, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017), pp.94-6, available at:

Ali, Tariq, The Extreme Centre: A Warning, Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.2 (2017), pp.71-2, available at:

Austen, Jane, Northanger Abbey, Ladprao 64, available at:

Baxter, Stephen and Alastair Reynolds, The Medusa Chronicles, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at:

Chang, Ha-Joon and Ilene Grabel, Reclaiming Development: An Alternative Economic Policy Manual, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.1 (June, 2017), pp.103-7, available at:

Cheng, Joseph Y.S., The Use of Mao and the Chongqing Model, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.53-5, available at:

Cornwell, Bernard, The Archer’s Tale, Ladprao 64, available at:

Dick, Philip K., The Man in the High Castle, Ladprao 64, available at:

Gaiman, Neil, Norse Mythology, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at:

Hamilton, Peter F., Night without Stars, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at:

Hanley, Steve, The Big Midweek: Life inside The Fall, Ladprao 64, available at:

Harvey, David, Rebel Cities, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017), pp.100-3, available at:

Honda, Tetsuya, The Silent Dead, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at:

Kawabata, Yasunari, The Old Capital, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at:

Leckie, Ann, Ancillary Justice, Ladprao 64, available at:

Liu, Cixin, Death’s End, Ladprao 64, available at:

McEwan, Ian, On Chesil Beach, Ladprao 64 (2017), available at:

Morris, Marc, King John: Treachery, Tyranny and the Road to Magna Carta, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.58-61, available at:

Munro, Alice, Open Secrets, Ladprao 64, available at:

Pasuk, Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Unequal Thailand: Aspects of Income, Wealth and Power, Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.2 (2017), pp.67-8, available at:

Piketty, Thomas, Chronicles on Our Troubled Times, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.1 (June, 2017), pp.96-9, available at:

Reynolds, Alastair, Revenger, Ladprao 64, available at:

Rice, Anne, Of Love and Evil, Ladprao 64, available at:

Sassen, Saskia, Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.51-3, available at:

Schlosser, Eric, Gods of Metal, Nepalese Journal of Management Science and Research, Vol.2 (2017), pp.69-70, available at:

Stross, Charles, Empire Games, Ladprao 64, available at:

Upreti, Bishnu Raj, Sagar Raj Sharma and Suman Babu Paudel, eds., Food Security in Post-Colonial Nepal, SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.1 (June, 2017), pp.99-103, available at:

Varoufakis, Yanis, Adults in the Room, SIU Journal of Management, Vol,7, No.2 (December, 2017), 96-100, available at:

Zizek, Slavoj, Against the Double Blackmail: Refugees, Terror and Other Troubles with the Neighbours, The Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.1 (January-April, 2016), pp.55-8, available at:


Journal of Shinawatra University, Vol.3, No.3 (Sep-Dec, 2016)

Welcome to the Vol.3, No.3 (Sep-Dec, 2016) issue of the Journal of Shinawatra University. This is a double-blind peer-reviewed academic journal accepting papers in any field of scholarly endeavour.

Journal of Shinawatra University

Volume 3, Number 3, Sep-Dec, 2016

Table of Contents

Editor’s Introduction

Peer Reviewed Papers

The Ancient Economics of Japan: Criticizing the Economics Situations of Japan in Ancient time until Edo period – Sittichai Anantarangsi

Analysis on Present Situation in Tuanjie town Kunming for being a prototype of Agritainment mode – Yang Fang

Automation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution in Thailand: Evidence from the Automotive Industry – Somlerk Karnwiwat

Book Reviews

Society and Economy in Ancient Nepal by Prakash Narayan – John Walsh (download here: Narayan)

Democracy in What State? by Agamben, Giorgio, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaid, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Rancière, Kristin Ross and Slavoj Žižek – John Walsh (download here: Agamben)

Shan and Beyond: Essays on Shan Archaeology, Anthropology, History, Politics, Religion and Human Rights by Montira Rato and Khanidtha Kanthavichai, eds. – John Walsh (download here: Shan)

General Editorial Policies                                       

SIU Journal of Management, Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017)

Welcome to the Vol.7, No.2 (December, 2017) issue of the SIU Journal of Management, which is the double blind peer reviewed academic journal published here at Shinawatra University in Thailand. Download the full edition here (7.2. Final).

Here is this issue’s table of contents:


Volume 7, Number 2, December, 2017
Editor’s Introduction 4


1. Assessing the Operating efficiency of Vietnamese Microfinance Institutions and Its Implications for National Transformation – Pham Hong Linh and Nguyen Thi Thu Trang               7
2. Role of Emotional Intelligence in Organizational Citizenship Behaviour – Shameema Ferdausy, Anupam Kumar Das and Suchana Akhter             20
3. Entrepreneurship and Nation Building in a Changing Environment: Health Education Perspective – Afolabi Joseph Fasoranti                                        49
4 Team Learning in the Midst of Strategy: A Sun Tzu & Clausewitz Perspective from the 1996 Mount Everest Disaster – Ravee Phoewhawm                     64


2nd International Conference on Recent Trends in Management                                                               91


1. The Fire and the Tale by Giorgio Agamben – John Walsh  94
2. Adults in the Room by Yanis Varoufakis – John Walsh     96
3. Rebel Cities by David Harvey – John Walsh                   100

CALL FOR PAPERS                                                                 104

AUTHOR’S GUIDELINES                                                         106

ABOUT SHINAWATRA UNIVERSITY                                   109

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD                                            111


Review of The Archer’s Tale by Bernard Cornwell

The Archer’s Tale

Bernard Cornwell

London: Harper Collins, 2005

ISBN: 10-0-06-093576-6

374 pp

In this enjoyable romp through the Hundred Years’ War, we follow the adventures of the sponymous Thomas of Hookton, who travels through France with the English army aiming to make a fortune at the expense of the unfortunate local people. Thomas has the additional goal of seeking revenge against the unknown French raiders who destroyed his home village and, also, there are some unfinished issues relating to his heritage – his father was a priest of unknown provenance and, as readers, we expect there will be gradually revealed through the course of his novel and, since the front cover presents this as the first book of the Grail Quest series, over the course of other books as well (I am going to guess it will be three altogether).

Along the way, Thomas has various adventures and the strumpet fate pushes him down and pulls him back up again. Cornwell is a veteran of the historical genre and readers may be familiar with others of his works (e.g. the Sharpe series and The Last Kingdom) which have found their way into being adapted for the screen. The characters are vivid and deployed deftly so that the villains appear when needed and the heroes have to suffer enough for us to bond with them. The language and style do not really compromise with the needs for contemporary readers to be able to understand the text without thinking much about it and there is nothing to suggest the depth of consciousness that the medieval mind might enjoy and which has been portrayed so brilliantly by Dorothy Dunnett, among others. However, as the concluding historical note observes, nearly all of the principal incidents described did in fact happen in pretty much the way that was described. These were, indeed, grim events and although the nitty-gritty of the rape and pillage is kept off the page, it is certainly there in the background.

The main theme of the book is the role of the archer, specifically the English archer – there are some Welsh archers (Pat, for example) but they have the grace to wait in the background. It seems to have been true that archers were a particularly dangerous force on the battlefield but, assuming we are not guilty of exaggerating their importance, why did other countries not seek to replicate them? Cornwell himself has no answer other than that it must have been a very difficult skill to acquire and to require very time-consuming practice and people from other countries were not up for it. There have been archery specialists in Southern Britain since Neolithic times and perhaps the yew wood was particularly helpful. Other places specialised in other forms of warfare and there are various geographic, cultural and social issues that interact with each other to produce specific forms of military practice. For example, in this book we have the well-known Genoese crossbowmen, while the French are of course busy with the flower of their chivalry. Meanwhile, I remember going to school every day past St. Mary’s Butts in Reading, at which men came to practice archery under the orders of King Edmund IV (who is featured in this book, although for some reason his vital Reading links are overlooked). It is one of the few things for which Reading is known, together with Queen Victoria’s enmity, the statue of the lion which would fall over in real life and Oscar Wilde’s imprisonment (now that the biscuit factory has closed down).

As mentioned previously, this is an enjoyable romp through history – we end up at the Battle of Crecy (spoiler alert, we English won) and there is plenty more of the story to come. There is also the Holy Grail to be found and, one suspects, some heresy and persecution to come. Fun.

Review of Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen

Northanger Abbey

Jane Austen

London: Collins Classic, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-00-736860-0

XIV + 258 pp.

At the risk of suffering from the curse of Morris Zapp, I did not read Jane Austen while pursuing my undergraduate degree in English Language and Literature – it is necessary to choose which courses to take on the basis that one person cannot read everything and I preferred Old English, Medieval literature and so forth. I have tried to catch up with some of the things I missed over the years since but there are so many other books and, besides, I have to spend a fair amount of time reading things for work. Anyway, the point of this preamble is that Northanger Abbey was new to me and, one afternoon having popped I to Sanmin ( I thought it was about time to change that situation and I am glad that I did.

The plot follows Catherine Morland, a young woman from a family at the lowest possible level of ‘quality’ and her adventures in exotic Bath and beyond. Her life appears to be a crushingly boring round of household chores and she has aimed to avoid the worst effects by allowing her mind to become filled with various notions. Her understanding of the world and the people who live in it is challenged after she gratefully accepts an invitation from the neighbouring Allen family to spend a fortnight in Bath, where people go to take the air or the cure or somesuch thing on an annual basis. She must then navigate the issues of what to wear, what to talk about with other people and, over and above all, how to get an introduction to someone else, almost anyone else. Without such an introduction, one must be passed over in silence even in the height of one of Bath’s notorious balls, so full of a violent press of people it seems like it might literally be dangerous.

Fortunately, such introductions are eventually secured and Catherine faces new challenges, including how to evaluate the intentions and impressions formed upon certain young men around whom she now orbits and is orbited. She finds on the one hand that opinions can differ (even in the case of profound issues such as preferences for novels and novelists) but that it is the nature of polite society that such differences might be managed without the need for unpleasantness. She is subsequently invited to spend time at the Tilney Estate, which is the eponymous Abbey and there, too, certain other of her notions are disabused, albeit that the essential and sturdy carapace of the emerging bourgeois social system must not be seriously threatened. Sinister events are shown to have perfectly respectable motivations and the need for heroic individual acts are, like Adam at the end of Paradise Lost, no longer required.

We have been living in the age of the veneration of Auntie Jane for some time now and her cultural footprint may now be found not just on the screen and the stage but also in the contemporary video game and the mash-up horror parody, among other places. In addition to the pleasure of reading her work, therefore, it is appropriate to note that she really was a very good writer. The critical eye most commonly focuses, of course, on the nature of the relationship within small households which may be considered in isolation, as if the rest of the world did not exist. However, although the proletariat does not raise its head, it does seem to be present, around the edges and the margins, keeping the whole thing going by virtue of slow accumulation and endless sacrifice. Her work needs no recommendation from me, of course but she may have one anyway.

Review of Revenger by Alastair Reynolds


Alastair Reynolds

New York, NY: Orbit, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-316-55556-2

425 pp.

The evidence of alien life and successful human attempts to transcend planetary geography are all around the people in this swashbuckling new novel by leading science fiction writer Alastair Reynolds but, alas, our ability to take advantage of these resources has been drastically diminished by the impact of entropic ageing. Like our understanding of the people of Dark Ages Britain, who looked upon the works of the departed Romans as the products of the Age of Giants, so too does humanity consider alien artifacts with a wild surmise. Those brave pirates who are able to penetrate the artifacts (which act according to predictable although gnomic rhythms) and can bring back swag from the inside without meeting catastrophic failures might be able to live very well on the proceedings for years to come. Yet the proceeds will quickly be watered down if the crew size is too large and so the pirate captains have an incentive to minimise crew numbers by ensuring that those who are enlisted re appropriately skilled for their main function and, also, preferably with other strings to their bows. Some skills may be obtained through hard work and aptitude but others are arcane and difficult to find. Principal among these skills is bone reading. For some reason, aliens have left behind a series of extra-solar system skulls from which, given the right equipment and conditions, may be coaxed communications from across space. A good bone reader would be capable, therefore, of providing a significant competitive advantage for their captains and that leads to benefits all round.

Enter, then, our two heroines, Adrana and Fura Ness, who hail from a solid bourgeois background which they are obliged to leave and seek their fortunes among the stars. As natural bone readers, they are able to obtain employment and lodging with Captain Rockamore and his crew, where prospects seem initially bright. Alas, not all who dwell in space are well-intentioned and the Monetta’s Mourn becomes victim of a space-jacking and forced to suffer the none-too-tender ministrations of notorious pirate Bosa Sennen. This sets the course for the rest of the book and we await the eponymous ship to arrive on the scene and set things aright.

I have to admit that when I first heard of this book, my heart sank slightly. I am a fan of Reynolds and I have seen what can happen when otherwise sensible writers (e.g. China Mieville and Steven Erikson) dip into parody and would-be satire. However, Revenger does not suffer from these kinds of problems. The universe created is detailed and vivacious and the characters must take the consequences of their actions seriously. There is a pirate-like energy and roister to the action but this does not lead to childishness or superficiality. The characters provoke an emotional response and clearly change and mature as the result of their experiences. The conclusion of the novel suggests that a sequel (and perhaps more) would be possible and, if that is the case, I would be happy to read that too.